Voices

And now, almost unmentioned in the media, their holy places are also being desecrated

Album: Karine Babajanyan, Puccini Arias (EMI Classics)

Not even stand-ups tanking at the Glasgow Empire have died as often as divas specialising in Puccini heroines – but who doesn't enjoy a good death scene, especially when animated this elegantly?

Observations: Britishness plays it for reel

Kutlug Ataman is Turkey's foremost contemporary artist, but for his latest exhibition at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, he's turned his eye on the subject of Britishness.

Double Dream/Letters to Milena, Kings Place

If classical improvisation is difficult, it’s doubly so when the goal is transposition into jazz; how two pianists can combine together in this way is hard to imagine.

Benjamin Zephaniah: We must stand up to hatred

Genocide is an appalling crime against humanity that we hope will never again be repeated. Today, as we approach Holocaust Memorial Day , we might stop and reflect on the fact that it still has the potential to be repeated and perpetrated around the world, unless we are on our guard and understand that our actions today have consequences tomorrow.

Turkish academics in apology to Armenians

Intellectuals break taboo to acknowledge genocide by Ottoman Turks

Monks brawl at reputed site of Jesus's tomb

Israeli police burst into one of Christianity's holiest churches yesterday and arrested two clergyman after an argument between monks erupted into a brawl next to the site of Jesus's tomb.

From public enemy to Turkey's national hero

Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk was persecuted in Turkey. Now he is a global ambassador for his homeland. Boyd Tonkin meets him

Ararat, by Frank Westerman trans. Sam Garrett

Up the mystic mountain in a flight from faith

Ararat: In search of the mythical mountain, By Frank Westerman

Climbers of all creeds are captivated by Mt Ararat

Robert Fisk's World: A voice recovered from Armenia's bitter past

It's a tiny book, only 116 pages long, but it contains a monumental truth, another sign that one and a half million dead Armenians will not go away. It's called My Grandmother: a Memoir and it's written by Fethiye Cetin and it opens up graves. For when she was growing up in the Turkish town of Marden, Fethiye's grandmother Seher was known as a respected Muslim housewife. It wasn't true. She was a Christian Armenian and her real name was Heranus. We all know that the modern Turkish state will not acknowledge the 1915 Armenian Holocaust, but this humble book may help to change that. Because an estimated two million Turks – alive in Turkey today – had an Armenian grandparent.

Two Turkish generals held over plot to kill Nobel laureate

Conspirators 'planned armed rebellion to destabilise Turkey'

Riots over vote force state of emergency in Armenia

A state of emergency was declared in Armenia yesterday after clashes between riot police and protesters left eight people dead and more than 30 policemen injured.

Against The Grain: The Armenian genocide - why Britain is at fault

Donald Bloxham is professor of modern history at the University of Edinburgh. He argues that the extermination of approximately one million Armenian Christians by Ottoman-Turkish authorities during the First World War was genocide, and that Britain is guilty of hypocrisy in its attitude towards the events.

Skylark Farm, By Antonia Arslan, trans. Geoffrey Brock

Where memory becomes legend
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A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

Who remembers that this week we enter the 150th anniversary year of the end of the American Civil War, asks Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served

Homeless Veterans appeal

Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served
Downfall of Dustin 'Screech' Diamond, the 'Saved By The Bell' star charged with bar stabbing

Scarred by the bell

The downfall of the TV star charged with bar stabbing
Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Security breaches and overhyped start-ups dominated a year in which very little changed (save the size of your phone)
Cuba's golf revolution: But will the revolutionary nation take 'bourgeois' game to its heart?

Will revolutionary Cuba take 'bourgeois' golf to its heart?

Fidel Castro ridiculed the game – but now investment in leisure resort projects is welcome
The Locked Room Mysteries: As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor Otto Penzler explains the rules of engagement

The Locked Room Mysteries

As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor explains the rules of engagement
Amy Adams on playing painter Margaret Keane in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

How I made myself Keane

Amy Adams hadn’t wanted to take the role of artist Margaret Keane, because she’d had enough of playing victims. But then she had a daughter, and saw the painter in a new light
Ed Richards: Parting view of Ofcom chief. . . we hate jokes on the disabled

Parting view of Ofcom chief... we hate jokes on the disabled

Bad language once got TV viewers irate, inciting calls to broadcasting switchboards. But now there is a worse offender, says retiring head of the media watchdog, Ed Richards
A look back at fashion in 2014: Wear in review

Wear in review

A look back at fashion in 2014
Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015. Might just one of them happen?

Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015

Might just one of them happen?
War with Isis: The West needs more than a White Knight

The West needs more than a White Knight

Despite billions spent on weapons, the US has not been able to counter Isis's gruesome tactics, says Patrick Cockburn
Return to Helmand: Private Davey Graham recalls the day he was shot by the Taliban

'The day I was shot by the Taliban'

Private Davey Graham was shot five times during an ambush in 2007 - it was the first, controversial photograph to show the dangers our soldiers faced in Helmand province
Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Many flyers are failing to claim compensation to which they are entitled, a new survey has found
The stories that defined 2014: From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions

The stories that defined 2014

From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions
Stoke-on-Trent becomes first British city to be classified as 'disaster resilient' by the United Nations

Disaster looming? Now you know where to head...

Which British city has become the first to be awarded special 'resilience' status by the UN?