News An aerial picture of the Grand Canyon in Arizona from around 30,000 feet (10,000m)

It was thought that the global landmark was perhaps 70million years old

Science: Technoquest Interplantary debris/ Crocodile armour/ Volcanoes/ Hiccups

Questions for this column may be submitted by e-mail to sci.net@campus.bt.com

Where I'll be in 2028, when asteroid XF11 hits our planet

There are so many ways to prepare to meet our doom, but one scares me more than all the others ...

That was close: Earth dodges death by just 600,000 miles...

For a few hours yesterday it looked as thought that 30-year mortgage might not have been such a smart buy after all, writes Charles Arthur, Science Editor. It was announced that an asteroid a mile wide was whirling towards the Earth, and there was a real chance that unless we took some avoiding action, it would hit us and wipe out civilisation.

Science: A home from home

Nasa wants to establish a Moon base. But what would it be like to live there?

Cook sees Montserrat's agony for himself

Defying volcanic ash clouds that forced his staff to don surgical- style nose masks, the Foreign Secretary, Robin Cook, toured the Caribbean island of Montserrat on Saturday to see the plight of its residents.

Science: Big days on little planets: visitors from Earth call in

David Whitehouse on voyages to asteroids, the Solar System's fossils

Letter: Unseen asteroids

Unseen asteroids

Science: Asteroids' tidal wave threat

The impact of a wayward asteroid on one of the earth's oceans would spell disaster for coastal cities, a US scientist says. Such an impact would trigger massive tidal waves, or "tsunamis" capable of travelling thousands of kilometres and devastating entire coastlines - though Britain, it seems, would be spared the worst effects.

Letter: Cold meteorites

Sir: Charles Arthur ("Search for Greenland's thunderbolt", 16 December) perpetuates a popular misconception when he states that "On landing [a meteorite] would be incredibly hot, and melt its way through the icecap". Meteorites are cold when they land. Hence they preserve a record of their history in space.

Radar hunt for meteorite

Danish aircrews are planning to search for the meteorite which fell last week on the southern tip of Greenland by using ground-penetrating radar. New estimates suggest that the meteorite, which streaked across the dawn sky on 9 December, could weigh 50 tonnes or more.

Search for Greenland's thunderbolt

A dense meteorite crashed into the southern tip of Greenland last week. The hunt for it goes on, but it would take someone with Miss Smilla's feeling for snow to find it. This, however, is real life. Charles Arthur, Science Editor, investigates another narrow escape.

Letter: Space invaders

Sir: The threat to Earth from a devastating asteroid impact has somehow been both overestimated and underestimated in Charles Arthur's article about the Chicxulub crater ("Asteroid that killed dinosaurs will strike again - in 35 million years", 4 December).

Science: Asteroid that killed dinosaurs will strike again - in 35 million years

The asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago was caused by a comparatively small meteor of the size which could be expected to hit the Earth once every hundred million years, according to British scientists.

Books: Derail this stage-struck express

Michael Arditti argues that it's time to bring down the curtain on the cult of Stephen Daldry

Boxing: Oliver is back for more

Spencer Oliver hopes to go one better than Naseem Hamed and stop Italy's Vincenzo Belcastro when they meet for the Londoner's European super-bantamweight title at Alexandra Palace tonight. Belcastro, now 36, lost the European bantamweight title to Hamed in Sheffield in May 1994, surviving two knockdowns but still losing by a landslide.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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