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Rick Perry, suddenly the front-runner in the Republican nomination stakes, last month described Washington as a "seedy place" he didn't care for.

Obituary: Colin Rowe

COLIN ROWE was an architect who made his mark through his ideas and writings rather than his built work. In 1995 he was awarded the Royal Institute of British Architecture's Gold Medal, only the second scholar this century to receive this honour.

Obituary: Doug Sahm

"I'M A part of Willie Nelson's world and at the same time I'm part of the Grateful Dead's," said Doug Sahm. "I don't ever stay in one bag."

Film: Naked as the day he was born

Top directors are queuing up to work with him. He's even been arrested for drumming without any clothes on. So why isn't Matthew McConaughey a star?

Obituary: Terry Gilkyson

TERRY GILKYSON wrote several of the biggest hit records of the early 1950s. His "Memories are Made of This" became both a well-known song and a clever catchphrase for the nostalgia boom.

Cult rebuilding church at Waco

SIX YEARS after the police assault on the Branch Davidian compound at Waco in Texas, a group of volunteers has begun to rebuild a church at the site, hoping to make it into a memorial to those who died there. The church was among buildings levelled by the authorities after fire swept through the compound on 19 April 1993, killing 80 cult members.

Leading Article: Political mavericks are the false idols of our celebrity era

ALAN CLARK's sudden death has prompted a rush of tributes to the "maverick" in politics. This untamed beast, we are told, enlivens the political scene, adding an enticing frisson of unpredictability to the domesticated herd of loyal voting fodder that packs the parliamentary benches on both sides of the aisle. Who would not prefer to hear the floridly expressed opinions, however wacky, of Tories such as Alan Clark and Julian Critchley, or Labour's Austin Mitchell and Tony Banks, rather than the well-mannered, carefully crafted, repetitious soundbites that come from the promotion-hungry new members of Parliament?

Tuesday book: The day a city drowned

ISAAC'S STORM: THE DROWNING OF GALVESTON, 8 SEPTEMBER 1900

Texas braced for Hurricane Bret

SOUTHERN TEXAS was battening down the hatches yesterday in anticipation of the first big hurricane of the season. Bret, a category four hurricane - the second strongest, with winds of more than 140mph - had veered away from Mexico and was directly threatening Corpus Christi, the largest city on the Texas Gulf Coast.

Bankers head for a pinfall

The World Wrestling Federation is preparing to take on Wall Street.

Bush jnr hits campaign trail

LIKE A STORM blowing across the plains from Texas, George W Bush, the man most likely to carry Republican hopes in next year's presidential elections, set out on his first campaign trip yesterday.

Low & Bonar sells

Low & Bonar sells

Today Surbiton ...

A British online service provider is poised for expansion in the US and Europe, writes Roger Trapp

Travel Texas: Big hats, big park, big welcome

The Lone Star state is known for extremes, and extremists.

Tornado Disaster: It came like a jet plane, and nothing in science could halt it

SOME COMPARED it to the sound of a jumbo jet or a train coming through the house. Others remembered the bomb that destroyed the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. The destruction was sudden, terrible and all but irresistible, regardless of how sophisticated America is becoming in its ability to predict and spot these vast natural bulldozers that sweep across the plains states every year.

Obituary: Charles Sawtelle

THE SELF-proclaimed "Greatest Show in Bluegrass", Hot Rize was for 12 dazzling years amongst the finest outfits in the genre, marrying superb musicianship with showmanship.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?