Life and Style A model walks the runway during the Balmain show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2013

Balenciaga's spring/summer 2014 show plays out to thumping, bass-heavy and very, very loud beats... but only after four outfits

THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE

Christian Dior originally wanted to dress only well-born women. Instead, he became fashion's great democratiser

Hooked on classics

Although completely contemporary, these designs first took shape before Alexander McQueen was even a twinkle in his mother's eye. Audrey Hepburn's favourite Givenchy sheath dress, for example, has changed little over the decades, while Joseph Thimister at Balenciaga pays homage to his mentor by recreating the meringue- caped dress from original sketches by Cristobal. Yves Saint Laurent's Le Smoking suit has been in production for 30 years, and Coco Chanel was photographed by Cecil Beaton wearing a gold lace coat-dress, like the one shown overleaf, back in 1935. Reinvention for modern women. Photographs by Francois Rotger. Styling by Sophia Neophitou

Power flower

To people weary of eccentric designers, Anita Jenkins is a refreshing if unlikely new star. Her creations include fabulous flowered skirts, but she reveres Bill Gates as much as Balenciaga.

Caught between a frock and a hard place

The most awful thing has happened, so awful that I can hardly believe it. You know the man? Come, come. I have mentioned him often enough. The dreadful man, down in the basement, hammering away, bash bash bash bash WHEEEEEEEEE bash bash ...? The one who spent so many months, well over a year, wantonly ruining my life in his desperate attempts to get his shop going?

THE MILLINER'S TALE

Stephen Jones has been creating wondrous, gravity-defying hats since the heady days of the Blitz Club a decade and a half ago. His first commission came from the proprietor of the club, Steve Strange; and it didn't take long before his headgear was sitting atop the raggedy plaits of Boy George. But although Jones's fashionable creations gained him instant notoriety, it is his talent for making striking hats for all occasions that has been responsible for the continuing growth of his business. Jones makes hats for Galliano, Givenchy and Balenciaga; Philip Treacy, the other great Nineties hatter, began his apprenticeship with Jones. Last November, Jones opened his first shop, which is in London's Covent Garden. This Easter, the milliner offers tips on when and where to wear his hats.

A bohemian rhapsody

Sarongs over trousers, kaftans, arabesque jewelling and patterns ... Tamsin Blanchard finds Paris looking east for the winter collections. Photographs: Sheridan Morley

BOOK REVIEW / The shade. The birds. The cows.

Danger Zones by Sally Beauman Bantam, pounds 15.99; Victoria Coren reads an epic tale of post-traumatic stress and stunned rabbits

And to top it all, a hat from Mr Jones

Lucy Ferry tours the Paris ateliers with Stephen Jones, Blitz kid turned milliner to the design lite. A triumphant week, but a few ruffled feathers along the way. Photographs by Gavin Bond

OBITUARIES : Madame Gres

Germaine Emilie Krebs (Madame Gres), couturier: born Paris 30 November 1903; married Serge Czerefkov (one daughter); died 24 November 1993.

High fashion furs fetch wild prices

'SURELY that won't fetch much,' whispered one awestruck spectator in the auction room at Christie's. A wicked little sable coat, bristlingly real, was dangled in front of the bidders. The catalogue guide price read pounds 150- pounds 250.

'Eight couture' of a dedicated follower of fashion on sale

Let's talk about Mrs Heard de Osborne. A petite, bird-like beauty with a Lollobrigida-esque penchant for heavy eyeliner, Mrs Heard de Osborne was a shop-a-holic. Not just any old shop-a-holic. Mrs Heard de Osborne had a serious thing about clothes.

BOOK REVIEW / Must-haves stripped bare: 'The Designer Scam' - Colin McDowell: Hutchinson, 17.99

WHAT has happened to fashion in the 40 years between the acceptance of such a diktat as 'Whether she is entertained in a restaurant or at the home of friends, a woman luncheon guest must always wear a hat' and the appearance on the catwalk a few weeks ago of Vivienne Westwood's bare-breasted and micro-tailleured toppling totsies in plaid, to the strident horror of the tabloids (with a concomitant publicity coup to the canny Miss Westwood)? Incidentally, as no business is more sensitive to publicity than the fashion business, the author of this book managed to get a bit of the splashback from the MacFrock mock-shock on himself, and ran up a tough-

FASHION / I don't dress girls: Antony Price, designer to the trophy wife, and never a shrinking violet when it comes to his own talents, has a new range of affordable after-lunch wear and a thought or two about Paris

ANTONY PRICE has been in and out of fashion more times than the elastic insides of his evening dresses. First he was famous in the Seventies for his top-selling salad-print swirly skirt and the skin-tight, bulging-crotch stage clothes he designed for glam rock; then, during the Eighties, for his grand and curvaceous evening dresses that Janet Street-Porter famously dubbed 'result wear' and the superman-shouldered power suits he tailored for discerning media men. Now, Price predicts, his next 15 minutes of fame is approaching.

FASHION / Going lightly: Audrey Hepburn was dressed by Givenchy for nearly 40 years. Marion Hume describes more than a professional relationship

Audrey Hepburn's white oak coffin was carried to the grave by the men in her life: her brother, her two sons, her second husband, her partner Robert Wolders and her friend of 40 years, Hubert de Givenchy.

Fashion: Young, lean and mean: A new wave of designers stunned Paris. Some big names should be topping up their pensions, says Roger Tredre

A NEW world order is emerging in fashion. The designers who have been making the news in Paris over the past 10 days were unknowns until recently. A new wave (which first emerged in the late Eighties) is moving to the forefront. What it lacks in financial capital is made up for with bags of creative energy and humour, streetwise attitude, and a strong sense of being in touch with the world beyond the rue du Faubourg Saint Honore.
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