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The Week in Radio: How Radio 1 overcame my prejudices

Until now, I've always had the World Service and Radio 4 down as the places to look for hard-hitting, politically challenging documentaries. You know the kind. The ones that can deposit you, still in your dressing gown and slippers, into the middle of a sub-Saharan war zone, or a Bolivian coke factory, and deliver a sharp punch to the guts any time your concentration might be in danger of drifting off.

Marvin Miller: Sports executive who pioneered the concept of free

Marvin Miller was the founding executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association who led a revolution in sports by expanding the concept of free agency, which made many leading athletes multi-millionaires. "I loved baseball, and I loved a good fight, and, in my mind, ballplayers were among the most exploited workers in America" he wrote in his memoir, A Whole Different Ball Game.

Cold comfort for men

God rest ye merry gentlemen and don't let the winter weather cause you any dismay. All you need is a decent coat and a bit of layering.

Rescuers can throw ‘baseball’ cameras into danger

Life's mirrored art for centuries, but now it seems to have moved on to video-games. Two former MIT students have invented cameras that can bounce and roll, allowing front-line servicemen to throw them around corners - a technique they claim could save lives.

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Frankenweenie (PG) *** Ginger and Rosa (12A) ***

Tim Burton's career, which seemed in tailspin with the Gothic resurrection comedy Dark Shadows earlier this year, has somehow righted itself with Frankenweenie, his most enjoyable film in ages. This too is a Gothic resurrection comedy, a monochrome stop-motion animation that revisits and extends a live-action short he made for Disney in 1984. On one level it pays affectionate homage to horror classics such as Bride of Frankenstein – Burton is an obsessive pasticheur – though more importantly it shows that he still has an instinct for a good yarn.

Boyd Tonkin: The sporting novel often underperforms, but it still has

Without any pommel-horse gyrations and contortions, I can offer one genuine affinity between Olympic artistry and the other sort of contest embodied in the long-list for the Man Booker Prize. Aritomo, the mysterious Japanese gardener in Malaya of Tan Twan Eng's novel The Garden of Evening Mists, also excels at archery.