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Apple's disappointing update this week sent shares in most of its suppliers tumbling, but smartphone parts maker Laird got City approval after its strategy update yesterday.

Minus 11 as UK braces for widespread snow

Britain is lying in wait for widespread snow this weekend after another bitterly cold day in which temperatures in some places struggled to get above freezing.

Kronos Quartet/Trinity Laban Chamber Choir, Hackney Empire/Barbican (4/5, 2/5)

No chamber group has done more to change the musical landscape than the Kronos Quartet, and its short Barbican residency bade fair to reinforce the point.

The Weekend's Viewing: Birdsong, Sun, BBC1
Hugh's Three Hungry Boys, Sun, Channel 4

"This war provides daily lessons in the extraordinary simplicity of the human anatomy," says Stephen Wraysford, as he points out a detail on an écorché drawing in his dugout.

US scientists claim that 38 is too old for eggs to be frozen effectively

Change in law may allow 'three-parent IVF' in Britain

The controversial technique known as "three-parent IVF" came a step closer yesterday after the Department of Health asked the fertility regulator to conduct a public consultation into its acceptability.

Man accused of selling missile parts loses extradition fight

A retired businessman has lost his High Court battle against extradition to the US where he faces charges of conspiring to sell parts for Iranian missiles.

2012: Good year for the celebribaby, bad year for original films

2012: Good year/Bad year

Not since the turn of the millennium has a single year promised so much: the Olympics, Euro 2012, a US election, an extra day off, and oh, the end of the world. Here, we assess the 12 winners and losers, and ask what the year holds... apart from Armageddon

31 million eggs are eaten in the UK each day

The end of battery farms in Britain – but not Europe

A long-awaited ban will come into force on Sunday. But shoppers will still face an ethical choice when buying eggs

Drivers are 'unprepared for icy roads'

Only one in five motorists is prepared for severe weather on the roads this winter, according to the British Red Cross.

Leading article: The end of the road for intrusive signs?

Three cheers for proposals to rid Dorset's villages of unsightly road signs, rub out white lines and do away with loathed traffic cameras.

Nexeon tips magic dust into our batteries

Silicon anode technology is set for use in laptops, phones, even cars – sparking an electric revolution on the roads

My Edinburgh: David O'Doherty, comedian

There was a kerfuffle during my show one night at the Fringe last year. Two drunk men were having an argument. In these situations, it's best to turn on the fury cannons, say something rude to shut them up, and carry on. That is certainly what I should have done. Instead, I asked them what was wrong. One pointed to the other and barked, "He told me we were going to see Travis."

Minor British Institutions: Punning

How much less fun would a punless Britain be? It's always been fashionable to groan or sneer at plays on words, but that's mostly the envy of the slower classes for their betters with letters. True, Dr Johnson thought they were out of order, but he was a lexicographer.

Prince William and Duchess Catherine take time out

Prince William and Duchess Catherine have taken time out to enjoy an evening on a secluded island.

Rev up your bicycle and head for the hills

The Peak District is pioneering a new electric bike initiative. Rhiannon Batten discovers there's still some pedal power required

Jeremy Laurance: Taking a power nap will recharge the batteries

Ken Clarke was only doing what nature intended – taking a power nap. Research shows that as little as 10 minutes of shut-eye during the day re-energises the brain, boosts memory and reduces sleepiness. It is more effective than an extra hour or two in bed.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own