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Apple's disappointing update this week sent shares in most of its suppliers tumbling, but smartphone parts maker Laird got City approval after its strategy update yesterday.

Minus 11 as UK braces for widespread snow

Britain is lying in wait for widespread snow this weekend after another bitterly cold day in which temperatures in some places struggled to get above freezing.

Kronos Quartet/Trinity Laban Chamber Choir, Hackney Empire/Barbican (4/5, 2/5)

No chamber group has done more to change the musical landscape than the Kronos Quartet, and its short Barbican residency bade fair to reinforce the point.

The Weekend's Viewing: Birdsong, Sun, BBC1
Hugh's Three Hungry Boys, Sun, Channel 4

"This war provides daily lessons in the extraordinary simplicity of the human anatomy," says Stephen Wraysford, as he points out a detail on an écorché drawing in his dugout.

US scientists claim that 38 is too old for eggs to be frozen effectively

Change in law may allow 'three-parent IVF' in Britain

The controversial technique known as "three-parent IVF" came a step closer yesterday after the Department of Health asked the fertility regulator to conduct a public consultation into its acceptability.

Man accused of selling missile parts loses extradition fight

A retired businessman has lost his High Court battle against extradition to the US where he faces charges of conspiring to sell parts for Iranian missiles.

2012: Good year for the celebribaby, bad year for original films

2012: Good year/Bad year

Not since the turn of the millennium has a single year promised so much: the Olympics, Euro 2012, a US election, an extra day off, and oh, the end of the world. Here, we assess the 12 winners and losers, and ask what the year holds... apart from Armageddon

31 million eggs are eaten in the UK each day

The end of battery farms in Britain – but not Europe

A long-awaited ban will come into force on Sunday. But shoppers will still face an ethical choice when buying eggs

Drivers are 'unprepared for icy roads'

Only one in five motorists is prepared for severe weather on the roads this winter, according to the British Red Cross.

Leading article: The end of the road for intrusive signs?

Three cheers for proposals to rid Dorset's villages of unsightly road signs, rub out white lines and do away with loathed traffic cameras.

Nexeon tips magic dust into our batteries

Silicon anode technology is set for use in laptops, phones, even cars – sparking an electric revolution on the roads

My Edinburgh: David O'Doherty, comedian

There was a kerfuffle during my show one night at the Fringe last year. Two drunk men were having an argument. In these situations, it's best to turn on the fury cannons, say something rude to shut them up, and carry on. That is certainly what I should have done. Instead, I asked them what was wrong. One pointed to the other and barked, "He told me we were going to see Travis."

Minor British Institutions: Punning

How much less fun would a punless Britain be? It's always been fashionable to groan or sneer at plays on words, but that's mostly the envy of the slower classes for their betters with letters. True, Dr Johnson thought they were out of order, but he was a lexicographer.

Prince William and Duchess Catherine take time out

Prince William and Duchess Catherine have taken time out to enjoy an evening on a secluded island.

Rev up your bicycle and head for the hills

The Peak District is pioneering a new electric bike initiative. Rhiannon Batten discovers there's still some pedal power required

Jeremy Laurance: Taking a power nap will recharge the batteries

Ken Clarke was only doing what nature intended – taking a power nap. Research shows that as little as 10 minutes of shut-eye during the day re-energises the brain, boosts memory and reduces sleepiness. It is more effective than an extra hour or two in bed.

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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement