News The Houses of Parliament illuminated at night

Battersea have drawn up a list of their top mousers

Hollywood's last lone ranger continues to dodge the shots

Sam Shepard, enigmatic author and actor, gave a rare audience in London last week.

Power site gets greatest thrills on earth

Battersea power station in London will be turned into "the world's greatest entertainment and retail complex" under a pounds 500m plan announced yesterday.

THEATRE: The Dancing Master; BAC, London

First plays, like first novels, are usually safe, domestic, autobiographical affairs. The recent revival at BAC of Christopher Hampton's When Did You Last See My Mother? is a case in point. Two bickering adolescents, contemplating sexual hang-ups and unemployment. BAC's latest offering, The Dancing Master, the first play by actress Aletta Lawson, leaps to the other extreme, encompassing off-stage gang rape in Bosnia, body image, courtly dancing, snatches of opera, long-lost parents, love, lust and lavatory cleaning. If this is autobiography, she has led, as Lady Bracknell put it, "A life crowded with incident."

Property: A compact space with all mod cons

Studio flats are back in demand - provided they're in the right location.

Theatre A Doll's House Battersea Arts Centre, London

'As good a production as you are likely to see. It plays no tricks with Ibsen's text and subtly points up the overwhelming modernity of the play'

Letter: Asian view of Hindu `miracle'

Sir: The recent "miracle" experience by the Hindu community worldwide has no explanation in the realm of Western materialism ("The little miracle in Lady Margaret Road", 23 September). The West is usually inclined to seek the explanation of various natural and unnatural phenomena in terms of a finite set of variables. But, according to Hindu philosophy, the world is multi-dimensional, and there are many "happenings" which cannot be accounted for by using the existing model of Western rationalism.

Opera LE CINESI BAC, Battersea, London

Opera in London in the summer months is something of a non-event. Opera-goers head for the hills of Glyndebourne, Edinburgh, Salzburg, Santa Fe. But what is left is often unusual and stimulating: Almeida Opera and now BAC Opera. Where the Almeida has "establishment" backing, BAC is a more modest affair, aiming to "draw the richest young operatic talent back to London, giving audiences the chance to see the stars of tomorrow in a refreshingly intimate theatrical environment." Well, the environment at BAC is certainly intimate - a box seating about 60 - but refreshing? Musically, perhaps, but this week, with closed doors and no air-conditioning, audience, performers and instruments came close to meltdown.

LETTER : Long history of British blacks

From Ms Linda Bellos

Theatre NOTHING TO PAY Battersea Arts Centre, London

Caradoc Evans's Nothing to Pay is a Welsh mock-odyssey; the tale of a draper who leaves his village, first for the town, then London, in insatiable pursuit of wealth. It is the tale of a man - Amos Morgan - who is possessed and ruined by zealous smallmindedness. And its satiric finger is pointed relentlessly at the church for instilling a fatal combination of sheep-like thoughtlessness and rampant self-interest in its flock. No wonder it was shouted down when it was published in 1930. "Filth masquerading as truth," stormed the Western Mail. It may since have passed into relative obscurity, but it clearly touched a nerve.

A bug in the continuity

Hard Copy

Comments were 'off the record'

Chris Rea reports on the profound effects of 'unwitting' remarks

Obituary: James Gardner

James Gardner was the most difficult and one of the greatest acts in design to follow, writes Kenneth Grange [further to the obituary by Sir Hugh Casson, 29 March]. His modesty overshadowed a genius for making the commonplace magical and for giving the miraculous a place in the common culture. He was an artist, but invaluably an artist in commerce. The output from his inventive mind was boundless - most of us would be justly proud if we owned just one of his many careers.

A few minutes in Fry the spy's shoes

AND meanwhile, what about the understudy?

John Walsh suggests

Six very English restaurants

Many original features (missing): Do you need a spear railing head or plaster cornice? John Windsor explains how you can bring your crumbling villa up to spec

WHEN THEY stopped making Victorian villas they threw away the moulds - which were eagerly snapped up by ironfounders and plasterworkers. These days, if you cannot find reasonably priced architectural salvage to match the twiddly bits such as cast-iron railing heads or plaster ceiling cornices that have fallen off your villa, the chances are that you can find a local firm that has kept the original patterns.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003