Life and Style According to the hospital's union secretary, the A&E department resembled a 'M.A.S.H. unit' on Wednesday

Patients were left on trolleys outside the toilets and staff were reduced to tears, according to reports

A dead body is pulled from the rubble of the collapsed building
yesterday

Poverty is main culprit as 19 die in slum tragedy

Building collapse highlights rental laws which have left Beirut's poorest tenants living in danger

Steven Spielberg's name was covered up in a Beirut cinema showing his Tintin film

Robert Fisk: The adventures of Tintin in Beirut

We are all haunted by war.

Occupied: Beirut's heritage trail takes in Roman streets and Phoenician quarters

Robert Fisk: Phoenician footprints all over Beirut

I walked down a Phoenician street the other day, built under Persian rule.

Album: Beirut, The Rip Tide (Pompeii)

On 2009's March of the Zapotec, the Beirut mainman Zach Condon split his output between Mexican funeral-band brass music and a rather tired form of electropop.

Theatrical brilliance from Lebanon

A slight, 57-year-old man with a vertical shock of hair stands on a street corner in Beirut. He is Peter Sellars, the radical American theatre and opera director. His gaze and smile are simultaneously vivid and quizzical, radiating a Zen vibe that only just conceals his flashing, Catherine Wheel intellect. There’s a McDonalds 50 metres away, but he certainly isn’t here for a Happy Meal. He’s waiting for a remarkable young Lebanese actress and theatrical provocateur called Maya Zbib.

Robert Fisk: How long does it take before justice is irrelevant?

A great storm blew across Europe in 1993 and even the trees of Treblinka were torn out by their roots. The Nazis had destroyed their death camp before the arrival of the Red Army almost half a century earlier, scattering the remains of hundreds of thousands of their Jewish victims.

Dom Joly: A sad homecoming, to bury my brave father

My father died last week. He was a good man who served in the Fleet Air Arm in the Second World War before running the family business in Beirut with integrity and considerable bravery. He had a good life, but it's still a shock when you realise that somebody is no longer there.

New era for Chicago as Rahm Emanuel ends the Daley mayoral dynasty

Great civic events call for grand civic gestures. So, in preparation for his swearing-in as the Mayor of Chicago today, Rahm Emanuel treated the Windy City's inhabitants to a free Saturday night pop concert at a park near Lake Michigan. It was headlined by the soft-rock act Chicago, who achieved fame with the schlocky 1970s hit "If You Leave Me Now".

Mo Farah set for new coach

Nick Rose can remember little of his 5,000m run at Madison Square Garden on 12 February, 1982 - other than his British indoor record performance at the annual Millrose Games in New York City being regarded back home as “not much of a deal.” It will be different if Mo Farah manages to beat the clock, and Rose’s time of 13min 21.27sec, in the Aviva Grand Prix at the National Indoor Arena in Birmingham this afternoon – especially now that Britain’s male athlete of the year has announced his intention to move to the north-west American city known as “Little Beirut,” and to switch coaches to the man who finished two places and four seconds behind the Bristolian Rose in that near-forgotten 5,000m race at ‘The Garden.’

The Experts' Guide To The World: Beirut

It's Hariri's table, just to the right of the main door, the seat with its back to the street, just where he always took café au lait, just where he took coffee with friends seven minutes before he was assassinated. The murder of former prime minister Rafiq Hariri – via the UN tribunal's indictment of the supposed murderers – has placed Lebanon as close to the abyss as it has been for many years. And for a few weeks after his Valentine's Day massacre in 2005, along with 20 others, the Etoile restaurant kept a coloured photograph of the dead man, grey-haired, smiling wanly, upright at his seat.

Beirut braced for street violence

Lebanese special police forces tightened security around the government palace and other official buildings yesterday amid growing fears that the country's political crisis could descend into street battles.

Look. You can almost see Beirut

Just two hours from the capital of Lebanon, you can enjoy some good-quality skiing. Minty Clinch reports

Open Jaw: 'The people of Beirut are warm and welcoming'

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Simon Calder: 'I want Ryanair and easyJet to fly to Beirut'

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003