Bill Gates

The world's most generous billionaires

As Mark Zuckerberg announces plans to donate 99 per cent of his Facebook shares, who are the other big beasts with deep pockets? Simon Usborne charts the most generous

Thomas Jackson: Judge who tried to split up Microsoft

Thomas Penfield Jackson, who died of cancer on 16 June at the age of 76, was a federal judge in Washington who presided over a Microsoft antitrust case and ordered the software giant to be split up. He also presided over the the drug possession trial of the former Mayor of Washington, Marion Barry.

Why nerds are inheriting the earth

The best-selling books, hottest cinema tickets and most desirable gadgets have one thing in common – they have a high nerd count. Alice-Azania Jarvis offers a spotter's guide to the geeky species that is inheriting the earth.

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Ed Roberts: Pioneering electronics engineer who built the first widely

Ed Roberts was one of the early pioneers in the world of personal computing, an electronics engineer who designed and created the first widely available home microcomputer in 1974. With no keyboard, no screen and only a set of switches to programme it, this was a different beast to today's laptop and desktop PCs. However, it is thanks to Roberts and his colleagues that computers emerged out of the worlds of academia, the military and commerce to make their way into our homes.

The greatest wine sale ever known

The Tour d'Argent's cellar is one of the best in the world, but it is running out of space. So the Parisien restaurant has decided to sell off 18,000 bottles – and there are bargains to be had.

Time to log off: Bill Gates steps down from the top job at Microsoft

In 1975, he declared it his ambition to put 'a computer on every desk and in every home'. As Bill Gates today steps down from the top job at Microsoft, and focuses instead on his extraordinary philanthropic legacy, Stephen Foley examines how this geek from Seattle changed our world

Office romance: how Bill met Melinda

In summer 1986, freshly graduated from Duke University with a degree in computer science and economics, Melinda Ann French was working as an intern for IBM. She told a recruiter she had one more interview – with a new company called Microsoft. The recruiter was keen. "If you get a job offer from them," she said, "take it, because the chance for advancement there is terrific."