Voices

The wise knew the demise would be slow. Bill Gates gave newspapers another 50 years

Letter: Nerd or profiteer?

Letter: Nerd or profiteer?

Look who's talking

The business year in pictures

The Big Picture: From little things: techno artist creates ultimate jigsaw

Techno-art: Photomosaics - such as Flamingo (above), Jeune Homme Nu (below) based on Hippolyte Flandrin's Young Man by the Sea and commissioned portraits of Al Gore, United States Vice-President, and Bill Gates, president of computer giant Microsoft - are created by Robert Silver, president and chief executive officer of Runway Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Silver, 28, developed a software program which arranges thousands of tiny photographs to make a different single image visible from a distance, as the details from Flamingo and the bather on this page show. A number of Silver's shifting-focus, densely detailed works have been made into posters

Letter: Bill Gates is not the mystery pounds 8m housebuyer

Your article "Buy a house in London ..." (30 November) speculates that the "mystery purchaser" of a house in Holland Park, London is Bill Gates, founder and CEO of Microsoft Corporation, and that he had threatened to move Microsoft's headquarters to Britain as well. It also states that the house is registered in the name of a Seattle-based corporation, implying that this is a company associated with Bill Gates and/or Microsoft.

Network: Bill Gates beware, America's consumer crusader is on to you

Ralph Nader became a legend in the United States by taking on corporate giants such as General Motors. Now he is waging a guerrilla war with the richest man in the world. He tells John Carlin why he believes that Bill Gates and Microsoft are a potential threat to democracy and market freedom.

The real trouble with funding

The trouble with science funding in Britain doesn't lie with scientists, or the Government. Earlier this week Microsoft announced more funding for the brightest minds of Cambridge University, and the Canadian telecoms company Nortel announced the fruits of the work of Ian Vance - a Briton who has figured out how to send Internet communications over mains electric cables.

Teach me to be; the next Bill Gates

Bill Gates, Richard Branson and Clive Sinclair are all entrepreneurs who have made it without formal qualifications. Entrepreneurially inclined degree students, meanwhile, complain that they get little support for their extra-curricular activities. Jack O'Sullivan asks what can be done to foster a more commercially minded teaching culture

Bill Gates backs Blair's computer crusade

Bill Gates, the multi-billionaire head of Microsoft yesterday promised the Prime Minister advice and involvement but no money in the Government's crusade to connect every pupil to the Internet.

Dyslexia gave him the drive, now Bill Gates has become his bete noire

He is not only a virtual visionary but a pragmatist aware of the dangers of Microsoft's dominance of the industry. Mark Vernon interviews Ray Hammond, information technology futurist with a mission: stopping Bill Gates

Bill Gates chips in to help Cambridge

Bill Gates, the world's richest businessman, has staked his claim for a place in a new world benefactors' superleague with a donation of pounds 12m to Cambridge University.

Of all the fragrant media stars Bill Gates is strongest

The days when businessmen were businessmen and stars were stars is long gone. Now heads of US corporations are the biggest stars of all. But none approaches Bill Gates in presence or power. He has moved from media-shy nerd to the man the media can't get enough of. And he is giving freely of himself, as only a multi-billionaire can.

What you can buy for a trillion dollars

Two little items from the last few days' papers. One is that Bill Gates, head of Microsoft, looks like becoming the world's first trillionaire - a personal fortune of more than $1,000 billion - in the next seven years, or so calculates The New York Times. The other, from the Mirror, reports that there are now 130,000 sterling millionaires in Britain and that there will be 200,000 by 2000.

Whatever happened to... Telstar

The Yves of a New Dawn

Of mice and men

Interview: Po Bronson; First he crucified Wall Street, now America's hottest new satirist has turned to Silicon Valley with a novel which takes the lid off the billion- dollar workings of the infotech industry

What has Bill Gates done to Cambridge property?

Microsoft's arrival in Cambridge could spell new headaches for an over-crowded city where house prices are already spiralling out of control.
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