Arts and Entertainment Jane Campion will succeed Steven Spielberg as president of the Cannes jury

The first female director to win the Palme d'Or said she 'can't wait' until May

Haneke, maestro of misery, wins Cannes Palme D'Or

Judges' unexpected choice matches mood at most restrained festival for years

Haneke's 'The White Ribbon' wins Cannes top prize

Austrian director Michael Haneke's somber drama "The White Ribbon" claimed the top prize today at the Cannes Film Festival, where Quentin Tarantino and Lars von Trier entries earned the acting honors.

Screen Talk: Gilliam tilts at windmills again

One project certainly getting everyone geed up is the prospect of Terry Gilliam resurrecting his ambitions to make a movie based on Cervantes's "Don Quixote". Gilliam has hooked up with Oscar-winning British producer Jeremy Thomas. Screenwriter Tony Grisoni's script revolves around a film-maker who is charmed into Quixote's eternal quest for his lady-love, becoming an unwitting Sancho Panza. The move is the latest twist in a movie-making saga almost as epic as Cervantes' 17th-Century classic. Nine years ago, the original shoot suffered a series of setbacks captured in the documentary "Lost In La Mancha", which went on to became a cult hit in its own right.

It's always nice to score a Palme d'Or – Gerrard hits Cannes

Footballer takes to the red carpet in support of school friends' film

Tears and triumph on the Cannes red carpet

Cannes 2009 signals hard times for serious moviemakers, says Geoffrey Macnab

Shy teenage star shuns red carpet of Cannes

Tale of life on a council estate acclaimed at film festival

Cannes Diary: Writing is 'sexless'

Despite being just the fourth female president of the jury in 62 years, actress Isabelle Huppert said this meant little to her, or to womankind. "I don't believe there are male and female forms of writing," said the recipient of two previous Cannes Best Actress awards, "Cinema is universal." But fellow juror and British writer Hanif Kureishi questioned the lack of diversity: "I'm not sure we have had a black or Asian [president] and I'm not sure when that will occur."

Roll out the red carpet. We're off to Cannes for a family holiday

As the world's movie stars and directors head for the French seaside resort, Jonathan Brown asks if it's possible to take a budget break in this Mediterranean haunt of the rich and famous

Observations: The Antichrist comes to Cannes in a camper van

Just about now, Lars von Trier will be trundling off in a camper van (he hates to fly) from Denmark to France for the Cannes premiere of his latest feature, Antichrist. The journey takes five days there and five days back.

Leading Article: Le crunch

It is said that next month's Cannes Film Festival will be a more austere event than in previous years. The mind boggles at what this might mean for this annual gathering of the wealthy, pouting and famous on the shores of the Mediterranean.

Not so sweet: Candy brothers ready for scaled-back Cannes

Property entrepreneurs the Candy brothers will once again be taking their lavish yacht Candyscape to the Mipim real estate conference in Cannes this week.

Death on opening day of Regates Royales

East coast yachtsman Wilf Tolhurst was killed today when two British yachts collided in 20-knot north-easterly winds and confused seas on the opening day of the Regates Royales in the Bay of Cannes today.

French school film is the Class act in Cannes

The Cannes Film Festival's Palme d'Or was won by the French production Entre les murs (The Class) last night. The film, directed by Laurent Cantet, used teachers and students to chronicle a year in the life of an inner-city school. "The film we wanted to make had to be a reflection of French society – multiple, many-faceted, complex," said Cantet. "Sometimes also with friction that the film does not try to cover up."

The day that Cannes burned

There will be rows and controversies at this year's film festival – but nothing like the revolutionary fever that gripped the Croisette in 1968

Academic set for Palestinian 'unity' leadership

A US-educated microbiologist who used to be president of Gaza's Islamic University is emerging as a possible candidate to head the "national unity" government that Palestinian leaders are predicting will replace the current Hamas-dominated cabinet.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
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Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn