Sport July 1908: Anthony Wilding of New Zealand in action during the tennis championships at Wimbledon

Before there was Federer, Borg or Laver, even before there was Lacoste, there was Anthony Wilding.

Care worker 'stabbed man after girls' night out'

A care worker stabbed her friend's boyfriend to death after the pair had sex with two soldiers they met in a pub, a court heard today.

Archive reveals life of the 'Red Dean of Canterbury'

Academics are trawling thousands of documents belonging to a controversial cleric who counted Mao and Castro among his friends

Mary Tudor, By Anna Whitelock

"One sees nothing but gibbets and hanged men." The aftermath of Sir Thomas Wyatt's Kentish rebellion of 1553 characterises the tormented reign of Mary, sandwiched between the Stalinist revolution of Henry and the economic flowering of Elizabethan England. But worse was to come for Mary.

Man held in 1988 rape probe

A 57-year-old man was arrested today by police investigating the rape of a young woman 22 years ago.

Leading article: The ignored gospel message

Lord what fools these mortals be. It is difficult for an outsider to look upon the febrile maunderings of the General Synod of the Church of England without a sense of bewilderment and mild irritation. The body which is the parliament of the nation's established church is, all things considered, a pretty poor advertisement for the message of good news which its founder set out to bring humanity.

Canterbury's Roman Museum could fall victim to the credit crunch

Canterbury City Council is the latest local authority set to close museums as part of cost-cutting measures. It is wielding the budget axe and has decided that saving the city’s Christmas lights is more important than keeping the Roman Museum open to the public.

Angela's angels: How one woman took a school from the dog house to top of the class

In 2001, St Mellion in Cornwall was in the doldrums. Now it is praised to the skies – thanks to Angela Palin, the primary head of the year. Francis Beckett went to see her

The Sketch: You can't beat the House but you can whip it into shape

The Government doesn't care about the Commons because the Commons can't hurt the Government

Pro-Mugabe bishop locks out faithful

Anglicans forced to pray in the street as Zimbabwe cleric refuses to accept sacking

PM's mystery phone claim girl talk

The mystery over a series of lengthy late-night phone calls revealed on the Prime Minister's expenses claims has been solved.

Lesbian bishop sparks new church row

Archbishop warns election of Mary Glasspool could divide Anglicanism in two

Johnson trapped in blunderland by All Blacks' reality

England 6 New Zealand 19

Maori legend of man-eating bird is true

Creature that features in New Zealand folklore really existed, scientists say

Last Night's Television: Who Do You Think You Are?, BBC1<br />Location, Location, Location, Channel 4

If it was emotional understatement and his everyman qualities that made Martin Freeman's turn as Tim Canterbury in The Office so effective, then his sentimental brevity in the BBC's family tree magazine show Who Do You Think You Are? was a very different proposition. When watching, it was almost as if Jeremy Paxman, with tears in his nationalistic, self-regarding eyes, was looking down on Freeman with disdain from the Corporation's High Command. We should be primed for some pathos, expectant of some clean-cut, sugar-coated epiphany, something life-affirming and revealing about one of telly's hottest names. It never arrived. That's because genealogy is a scrapyard of crushed dreams, and many people's family trees are bored like Swiss cheese. For the first part of this programme, Freeman let the viewer believe that he was finding it hard to summon up any kind of interest in the distant past's minutiae. You can't blame him; he is a bloke's bloke. We were also told that his father died of a heart attack when he was 10. So he's probably had more emotional turbulence to weather than can be delivered in under an hour by the patina of light entertainment.

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