Sport July 1908: Anthony Wilding of New Zealand in action during the tennis championships at Wimbledon

Before there was Federer, Borg or Laver, even before there was Lacoste, there was Anthony Wilding.

Hamilton is happy to join Mauger at Welford Road

The former All Black wing Scott Hamilton says he is looking forward to linking up with his former Canterbury and Crusaders team-mate Aaron Mauger when he joins Leicester in November. The 28-year-old has confirmed that he will leave for Europe at the end of the current Air New Zealand Cup competition. He will join the Guinness Premiership side on a two-year deal.

Last Night's TV: Flying: Confessions Of A Free Woman, BBC4<br />Who Do You Think You Are? BBC1

Until she was about 42, Jennifer Fox had believed that she was living exactly the life that she'd wanted. Based in New York, surrounded by a network of close friends, she had felt happy working as a documentary film-maker and lecturer on film-making, travelling and working all over the world. Then her great friend Pat had been diagnosed with a brain tumour, and suddenly Fox twigged that life was short and bodies grew fragile. "It seemed we had been living our lives," she intoned in her fey, solemn, toneless drawl, "as if we'd be young for ever."

Hockey: Clewlow keeps Britain in game with crucial equaliser

Great Britain women kept alive their medal hopes after coming from behind to draw 2-2 with Argentina at a sunny Olympic Green Hockey Stadium. Having been hammered 5-1 by defending Olympic champions Germany in their opening match, GB could not have afforded another defeat in Pool B.

Bishops back plea for 'inclusive communion'

The Anglican leadership issued a stark message of inclusivity yesterday in a key sermon delivered to 650 bishops by a speaker invited by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Church rallies round Williams as African bishops boycott Lambeth

An international coalition of bishops is rallying to the support of the Archbishop of Canterbury in a move that appears likely to ensure Anglican unity as the church enters one of its most crucial weeks since the Reformation. In all, 650 bishops from around the world are gathering at the University of Kent in Canterbury for this week's Lambeth Conference. Apocalyptic scenarios have been predicted, but it now appears that the broader Anglican family will hold together thanks to a series of sermons by Rowan Williams appealing for unity and the desire among bishops – including many from Africa – not to be seen to be the wreckers of the communion.

Gay bishop forced to halt sermon after heckler calls him 'heretic'

The tensions tearing the Anglican Church apart were underlined last night as its first openly gay bishop was heckled during a sermon in London.

New Zealand 28 South Africa 30: Januarie the first lifts Boks

Scrum-half ends 10 years of hurt for South Africa in New Zealand as young All Blacks fall agonisingly short

Church in the lurch

The great and good of Anglicanism are in York for what could be the most explosive General Synod for centuries. Paul Vallely explains the issues that are at stake

New Zealand 44 England 12 : Question of attitude the latest poser for England

Does it hurt enough? Defeat, that is. Rugby in New Zealand is always cruel to the body. As the last rites were being read over the dying English season on Saturday night, appropriately by a team dressed in black, a whole clutch of players, from Mathew Tait and Toby Flood to Olly Barkley and Luke Narraway, were being stitched up, or having shoulder joints restored to their proper positions, or having hamstrings and ankles unmangled. It's a hard game, rugby union, and the rugby down here in the wintry South Island is harder than anywhere else.

Hansen&rsquo;s warning to All Blacks of little comfort to distracted England

This is one hell of a mess, to put it mildly. It is quite enough for a tired touring team to have the All Blacks on their backs in the wintry south island of New Zealand, where rugby folk show mercy in the way a miser shows the inside of his wallet. Now that the Auckland police are on their backs as well, England find themselves labouring under the dead weight of unrealistic expectation. They say they want to win this second and final Test, the last match of the unprecedentedly combustible season, but they cannot believe for a second that such a result is possible.

All Black camp's insecurities give Borthwick's team a chink of light

Great civilisations rise and fall in the time it takes England to win a Test match in All Black country: after John Pullin's amateur no-hopers successfully flew in the face of rugby logic to prevail in 1973, there was a 30-year wait for Martin Johnson's ultra-professional world champions-elect to achieve something similar. Yet if the chances of a red rose triumph at Eden Park tomorrow morning are not, statistically speaking, particularly brilliant, there is a growing feeling here that New Zealanders will at least have to sweat blood for their victory.

Andrew taunts Kiwis about World Cup 'obsession'

It takes an unusually bold variety of Englishman to stroll into All Black country, where the red rose army have achieved the grand total of two Test victories in the 45 years since they first paid a visit, and tell his hosts where they are going wrong on the World Cup front. Rob Andrew does bold rather well. Yesterday, the temporary manager-cum-coach informed his hosts that their infatuation with reclaiming the Webb Ellis Trophy they surrendered as long ago as 1991 was proving destructive.

Andrew faces tricky equation at No 8 after injury rules out Easter

Nick Easter, the first-choice England No 8 who captained the side against the Barbarians at Twickenham last weekend, will miss the forthcoming Test series with the All Blacks because of a fractured right hand. Easter suffered the injury during the Baa-Baas game – presumably during the natural run of play, rather than in the pantomime sparring arranged for the crowd's benefit in the early stages of the fixture – but the red rose medics were confident he would play a part against the All Blacks. That confidence was misplaced.

Crocker arriving next season to bolster Hull

The new regime at Hull has made its first signing with the recruitment of the Australian Test forward, Michael Crocker.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

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Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

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Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

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War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

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Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

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Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
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