Leading article: Safeguard the wood and the trees

It is a measure of the lack of trust in modern politics that no one seems to believe the Environment Secretary when she says that England's forests will be safe in the hands of private owners if the Government goes ahead with selling them off. A sale would be bad for wildlife and restrict public access to the land, the public feels. The minister, Caroline Spelman, says measures will be put in place to prevent that. But 75 per cent of voters polled oppose the plan to sell off half our forests in the largest change of land ownership since the Second World War. And there is more to this than a romantic attachment to the idea of Britain's ancient woodlands.

Lib Dem MPs threaten rebellion over forests sale

Liberal Democrat MPs are threatening to rebel against controversial plans by the Government to sell off part of England's forests, which will be announced today.

Spelman promises to close travellers' sites loophole

Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman today promised to stop travellers obtaining retrospective planning permission to allow them to remain permanently in camps which they have set up illegally.

Report highlights threat to biodiversity

A fifth of the world's mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians are under threat of extinction, a major report warned today as governments continued to discuss efforts to tackle losses to the natural world.

Caroline Spelman: Her curtains are shabby, but her axe is sharp

The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has efficiently identified cuts while other ministers dither. And yet, she won't take a position on wheelie bins. Matt Chorley meets Caroline Spelman

Martin Hickman: Approval is one thing, but will the public swallow GM foods?

Genetic modification isn't something that particularly vexes the public – at least for now. Research shows that public "concern" about the issue has fallen from 43 per cent in 2001 to 27 per cent in 2008.

Design: why buy British?

Globalisation has put pressure on all types of business to outsource production, move jobs abroad and, in doing so, cut costs. As a result British producers have been in decline for a number of decades. In recent years, however, increased awareness of climate change, a growing world population, political instability and the financial crisis – not to mention the ethical issues often associated with working conditions abroad – have forced consumers to think more carefully about where their produce comes from.

Leading article: A policy for the planet

The pace of global warming is so slow that it is hard for most mere mortals to grasp its implications. That may explain why so many people refuse to accept the science of climate change. It often requires creative artists to convey the scale of its challenge to humanity. In Earthquakes in London, the highly acclaimed play by Mike Bartlett at the National Theatre, an expectant mother is driven half-mad by her fears for the planet on which her baby will be born.

Britain must adapt to 'inevitable' climate change, warns minister

As experts call for action now, the coalition withholds green funding and appeals to private enterprise

Ministers braced for animal-lovers' anger over badger cull plan

Government expects legal challenges from wildlife activists as it consults on how to tackle TB in cattle

Environment Quangos: Green initiatives in the firing line

Ministers have denied abandoning their green ambitions, despite abolishing nearly 40 environment and agriculture quangos. Most controversially, Caroline Spelman, the Environment Secretary, is scrapping the Sustainable Development Commission, which advises the government on money-saving green initiatives.

Leading article: A failure of imagination

Before the election, David Cameron made much of his party's newfound enthusiasm for the environment. Under the Tories there would be no airport expansion or attacks on the green belt. Then, after the Conservatives joined forces with the Liberal Democrats, the greenest of the three main parties, many people justifiably hoped that the new Government was about to make the environment a top concern.

Unwanted gadgets that could spark a charity cash drive

Hoarded appliances to be recycled for good causes

Spelman plans to get tough on toy packaging and recycling

The toy industry faces a crackdown on excessive packaging under plans to reduce the amount of rubbish sent to landfills, the new Environment Secretary has warned.

Judgement day looms for Neville's zero-carbon footprint

The Man United star is passionate about his flower-shaped property – but others are less than convinced by it
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'