Arts and Entertainment Donnier darker: Jake Gyllenhaal and Hugh Jackman in 'Prisoners'

Prisoners has retained its number one spot, while Blue Jasmine looks set to become Woody Allen's most successful UK film release

<a target="_blank" href="http://blogs.independent.co.uk/independent/academy_awards_live/index.html">The Oscars as they happened: Scene by scene analysis</a>

A stunned Tilda Swinton wins best supporting actress, for her role as an over-achieving corporate lawyer in Michael Clayton. No-one looked more surprised than Swinton, who blanched visibly as her name was read out (instead of Cate Blanchett, the favourite), then mouthed "wow!" more than once as she popped out of her seat.



Paperback: Made For Each Other, by Bronwyn Cosgrave

Bloomsbury &pound;8.99 (308pp)

Fashion: Who has the Eco Factor?

It's not easy being green. To buy an Anya Hindmarch I'm Not a Plastic Bag last summer, you had to start queuing at 5am only to discover the "eco-bags" weren't organic, and had been flown halfway across the world. That said, there's no escaping the fact that this year, fashion developed a conscience: former Topshopper Jane Shepherdson joined the Fairtrade label People Tree; Lily Cole walked the catwalk for eco-label Noir; and Stella McCartney launched the organic skincare range Care.

Ready To Wear: Vivienne Westwood

Dress codes, as anyone who is aware of such things knows, are dead. Instead, a new, improved and rather more brilliantly diverse appearance is the order of the day at any half-glamorous event one might care to mention. Even the red carpet - for the past five years, home to an endless procession of strapless, corseted, fishtail gowns - has seen skirt lengths rise in recent months, and then fall, and then rise again, depending only upon the whims of the celebrity in question. There's no predicting what people may or may not wear these days, then. And that is a good thing.

The information on: `Pushing Tin'

What Is It?

Edinburgh Festival: Fringe Reviews

MUSICAL

SIZING HER UP

Interviewing an actor, Will Self thought, would be like discussing metaphysics with a parrot. In fact, his meeting with Cate Blanchett was more like a bizarre blind date which left him obsessed with one question: is she big or is she small?

The Information on `Plenty'

What Is It?

Theatre: The blonde enemy within

PLENTY ALBERY THEATRE LONDON

The evidence: The hair colourist's office

Jo Hansford has a salon in Mayfair and her own range of hair-colouring products. Clients include, Kate Winslet, Melanie Griffith and Elizabeth Hurley

Arts Diary

THE EVER-enterprising Almeida Theatre, which presents Cate Blanchett next week in David Hare's Plenty, is already working on its next coup. Ralph Fiennes has been approached by Almeida's director Jonathan Kent to reunite the partnership that produced a triumphant Hamlet a few years ago. Fiennes is keen to star in a Shakespeare season, playing two roles. One will certainly be Richard II, a part the actor was born to play. The other role being considered is Coriolanus.

Arts: What Cate did next

Last Sunday she won the Bafta Best Actress Award, on Friday her new film, An Ideal Husband, opens and in a fortnight she makes her West End stage debut. And that's just the beginning. David Benedict spoke to the very popular Cate Blanchett

Film: A short history of the cinema redhead

Witty, wilful, wild... Next to the screen's scarlet women, blondes are merely bland. By Nina Caplan

Real Choices: Book this

HOT ON the heels of Nicole Kidman, who took David Hare's The Blue Room to Broadway, is Cate Blanchett in a revival of Hare's Plenty. This alternative ginger-and-alabaster Australian, Oscar-nominated for her role in the film Elizabeth, plays Susan Traherne, a fictional ex-Special Operations Executive whose covert wartime activities make her a liability to her civil servant husband. Traherne's mental instability and frustrations between 1943 and the mid-1960s are a metaphor for Britain's struggles after WWII. Tickets to see Blanchett, whose co-stars include Julian Wadham and Debra Gillett, are already selling out. Will the fact that she remains fully-clothed imperil her chances of a transatlantic transfer? Book early to find out if Vanity Fair's latest cover girl could be Hare's next West End emissary. RH
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