News It has been confirmed the body discovered was that of three-year-old Mikaeel

Police confirm they have found Mikaeel's body in a wooded area in Fife, miles from his home

College Choir of St John's celebrates 500th anniversary

As a punt chauffeur and recent graduate, I spent a summer ferrying tourists up and down the River Cam, spinning ludicrous yarns about the University. Two things about this most beautiful of journeys will have stayed in the river-goers' minds: colliding with other punts and the chapel of King's College.

Why be happy when you could be normal? by Jeanette Winterson

Memories of mothers lost and regained

Funeral held for Turkey stab victim

A teenager whose boyfriend is the prime suspect in her mother's murder said an emotional farewell at her funeral today.

Missing manuscript acquired

Manchester University's John Rylands Library has acquired the missing seventh volume of the Colonna Missal, a service book made for the Sistine Chapel in Rome. It had held the other six volumes in its collection since 1901.

Peter Zumthor's experiments in space

The designer of this year's Serpentine Gallery pavilion is Peter Zumthor, a visionary whose best work is as much land art as architecture. Jay Merrick meets him

Rocking and rolling in the aisle

With the royal nuptials fast approaching, Gillian Orr picks a dozen classic wedding songs – but will they make next Friday's playlist?

Badly Drawn Boy, Travelling Band and guests, Union Chapel, London

“Hey, I can do this after all,” says a grinning Damon Gough – more popularly known as Badly Drawn Boy – as he basks in the applause of an appreciative Union Chapel crowd towards the end of this feelgood-fuelled charity gig. “F*ck LA.” There’s a roar of laughter from the pews. The evening is a validation for Gough, who had a much-publicised meltdown at the Troubadour Club in Los Angeles last December, threatening to fight an unruly crowd and then publicly quitting the music business (“I’m never playing live again - this has been a disaster,” he said).

Houses of the Holy: The historic churches that have been turned into a family home

It takes a leap of faith but for the brave, the reward at the end is a unique living space.

Canon AM Allchin: Theologian who fostered unity between Christianity’s major strands

The Anglican theologian AM Allchin wrote prolifically on Christian spirituality and, in particular, the relationship between Eastern Orthodoxy and the Christianity of the West. During a distinguished life as priest and academic, he strove to foster an awareness of the underlying unity between the major strands of Christianity, throwing new light on our understanding of diverse traditions and belief systems. He travelled widely, making available what he had experienced in places like Mount Athos and Romania in lectures, conferences, pamphlets and a score of books that are among the most readable, and stimulating, studies in their fields.

At their convenience: How one family transformed a public lavatory into a family home

In these cash-strapped times, astute house-hunters are looking outside the box at ways of creating individual homes in the most unlikely places. Jon Du Croz and his partner, Emma Lally, are a perfect example, having transformed what was once a dark and dingy Oxfordshire public convenience and electrical substation into a bright, open-plan living space.

Chapel Club, Heaven, London

Vocalist Lewis Bowman smiles wryly as he flexes his sinewy fingers, wrapping them tightly around his microphone. Starting a show with your best-known single is risky, but as Bowman delivers the gothic, melancholic lyrics of "Surfacing", which samples the 1930s classic "Dream a Little Dream of Me", he clearly relishes the challenge.

'Green scheme' will harness energy from crematorium to heat swimming pool

Heat from a crematorium will be used to warm a leisure centre and swimming pool in Worcestershire in a controversial green scheme expected to be approved tonight.

Brian Viner: I spent €250 and things started looking up

Last Sunday's opening instalment of BBC1's adaptation of Michael Dibdin's Aurelio Zen books, about an incorruptible detective in Rome – perhaps the incorruptible detective in Rome – got careful scrutiny in our house, because we'd only just come back from three days in the Eternal City. "That's where we had the ice creams," went up the cry, causing far more excitement than Zen (Rufus Sewell) being followed by a sinister fellow on a motorbike.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk