Ben Ainslie: The Olympics' most successful sailor on tactics, flying

Calling sailing elitist is a misconception Of course all sports at the highest level are expensive to compete; it costs a fortune to win the Tour de France. But in terms of grass-roots level, it's relatively inexpensive; you don't need your own dinghy, and at my local club in Lymington, local school pupils can sail for a fiver – that's comparable to any other sport.

A chess expert at nine, Carissa Yip is set to be master next

Percy Yip began teaching his daughter Carissa to play chess in 2010. After just one year, she could beat him. Two years later, the Massachusetts schoolgirl has just become the youngest female on record to reach the US Chess Federation’s (USCF) “expert” level. Carissa is nine years old.

Theatre Review: The Machine, Manchester Festival

When the interval arrived during The Machine I realised I had been so engrossed by the play that I had forgotten to take a single note during the first half. A play about a chess match between a man and a computer, as its author Matt Charman, had conceded beforehand, sounded almost terrifyingly dull. But this was no ordinary man. It was Garry Kasparov, the youngest world chess champion ever, who reigned unchallenged for two decades. Nor was it an ordinary machine. It was Deep Blue, then the most sophisticated chess computer the world had ever seen, which could analyse more than 500 million positions every second.

iOS 7: Jony Ive's new flat design revealed

On a night when Apple launched new MacPro, a new AirBook and no end of software bells and whistles, one subject is sure to dominate the post-keynote discussions: the bold and (most say) beautiful 'flat' design of the new iOS 7. 

Adrian Hollis: Classics don and chess grandmaster

Once famously described in the press as one of this country's hidden chess assets, Adrian Hollis spent a long and distinguished academic career as a Classics Tutor and Fellow of Keble College, Oxford. There, amid research focussed largely on Hellenistic and Roman poetry, he bestrode the often narrow confines of his art with consummate ease.

Hacked Off's Hugh Grant puts his money where his mouth is

Hugh Grant, a director of the Hacked Off campaign, says the pro-regulation pressure group is nowhere near as slick as it looks. The actor told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show that it actually consisted of "a few dandruffy professors sitting in a cheap office." Grant added that he was so certain that papers would not be hit with £1m fines by the new regulator, he would make a matching £1m donation to Comic Relief if any were levied.

Angling: Fishing for a doping scandal

In our jaded post-Lance Armstrong world, even the sleepiest sports are not immune to the vigilance of the United States Anti-Doping Agency. After a week spent crouched low, kneepads on, caught fish stuffed in their trouser pockets, the winners of last week’s World Ice Fishing Championship were led to a room in the Plaza Hotel, Wausau, Wisconsin, to be tested for steroids and growth hormones.

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