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Eerie images have captured a deserted village once dubbed the “real life Atlantis” after it spent over 25 years under water.

The Girl With No Heart, The Warren, Brighton Fringe

Have the galloping, whinnying heroes of War Horse inspired a new generation of theatre-makers? It would seem so. The Girl with No Heart from Sparkle and Dark, a promising young company which formed in 2009, is not so much a puppet show as a puppet masterclass. Over the course of 75 minutes, four performers (plus a guitarist and cellist who provide a plangent soundtrack from the side of the stage) conjure up characters, creatures and countries using papier-mache masks, cardboard boxes, sheets of paper and shadows.

Tesco has defended its decision to label a children’s chemistry set a boys’ toy

Tesco keeps chemistry set as a boys' toy despite protests

Tesco has defended its decision to label a children’s chemistry set a boys’ toy, despite criticism from gender equality campaigners.

Jacqueline Wilson said most children can not spell her name correctly

Jacqueline Wilson: 'Spelling is not something that seems to be taught at schools'

Tracy Beaker author Jacqueline Wilson has criticised the language skills of British schoolchildren – revealing that her young overseas fans write more eloquent English than UK kids.

Likes don't save lives: Unicef campaign takes on ‘slacktivism’

A new campaign for children's charity UNICEF highlights dissatisfaction within the charity sector for support that stops at engagement on social media.

Niall Ferguson has apologised for suggesting J.M. Keynes didn't care about future generations because he was gay

TV historian and Harvard professor Niall Ferguson apologises for 'stupid' comments about John Maynard Keynes' homosexuality

Historian apologises for latest smear, but 1998 book expressed similar sentiments

Hundreds flee Syrian town after overnight massacre

Hundreds of Sunni Muslims fled Syria's coastal town of Banias yesterday, after reports circulated that fighters loyal to President Bashar al-Assad killed dozens of people overnight. Activists claimed the killings took place two days after state forces and pro-Assad militias killed at least 50 Sunnis in the nearby village of Baida. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a pro-opposition monitoring group, posted online a video showing the bodies of 10 people – half of them children. One toddler was covered in burns. Reports and videos of the killings could not be independently verified as the Syrian government restricts access for independent media.

Nina Conti: The acclaimed ventriloquist on the seductions of acting and throat-singing

I struggled for 10 years as a jobbing actor Dad [the actor Tom Conti] was always very helpful. He said acting was about being real. It's a simple view, but it's difficult if you are not getting work in the first place. I felt a bit of a fraud calling myself an actor as I had so little work.

Memebers of the rebellious Free Syrian Army, who have been fighting in the country's civil war for over two years

Syria civil war: Bashar al-Assad's fighters accused of massacre in Banias

US State Department: 'We strongly condemn atrocities against the civilian population'

Keith Ridgway: A fusion of Dashiell Hammett and Paul Auster

Paperback review: Hawthorn and Child, By Keith Ridgway

The odd couple turn to crime-fighting

This Boy: A Memoir of a Childhood, By Alan Johnson

Slum roots of the best PM we never had

Invisible Ink: No 171 - Madeleine Henrey

Dying three years short of her century in 2004, Madeleine Henrey became a writer almost by chance, so it’s all the more surprising that she was a French woman writing in English for the British market. This miner’s daughter had grown up in the impoverished backstreets of Clichy and moved to Soho with her seamstress mother, where she found employment with a French newsagent.

In Mrs Thatcher, the young Damian Barr recognises another outsider, a survivor

Maggie & Me. By Damian Barr

A wry autobiography, set in 1980s Scotland, reveals an admirably balanced attitude to Maggie, memoir, and the wisdom of Granny Mac

Even elite schools such as Eton have schemes to help less wealthy parents

Swot up on how to pay school fees

Education costs are soaring but bursars and product providers have new schemes that may help

Bradley Wiggins on his way to victory in the opening stage time trial of the 2010 Giro d’Italia

Bradley Wiggins and his love-hate affair with the Giro d'Italia

Brit 'despises' the Giro as it's so crazy – and that's why he wants to win it so badly

Childhood draw as much influence from the dream pop that dominated 2010 as they do from Palma Violets

The Playlist: Iggy and the Stooges / Childhood / Ty Segall

Iggy and the Stooges

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine