News 7. London came seventh overall, it came second in diversity

If you thought dowries in Britain were a thing of the past, think again.

Business diary: Hand of God at work at the Bank?

Mervyn King once wowed an audience by explaining why the Bank of England was like Maradona. He referred to the Argentine's amazing second goal against England at the 1986 World Cup, when Maradona ran from the halfway, basically in a straight line, thus avoiding England's players who expected him to swerve. The Bank can do the same thing, King explained, since the markets expect it to change course. Now, however, Malcolm Barr of JPMorgan, reckons that the better analogy would be with Maradona's first goal in that game, when he got away with handball. The Bank's subtle shifting of its inflation forecasts, says Barr, are not quite so blatant – "but it is certainly lingering in an offside position, hoping not to be flagged".

Government advised to cap discrimination awards at £50k

City group fears open-ended compensation is catalyst for 'spurious' but expensive claims

London set to welcome the Olympics with a green revolution

Everything from Tower Bridge to the London bus will be given an eco makeover in time for 2012

City Blues: Cartoons by Marf, Guildhall Art Gallery, London

If the 2008 banking crisis had an architectural motif, it was the Gherkin. In City Blues, a series of cartoons about the financial crisis by the female cartoonist Marf at Guildhall Art Gallery, it appears at least a dozen times, an instantly recognisable shorthand symbol for the Square Mile's decade of excess, self-celebration and collapse. In one cartoon, the Gherkin has even found its way into a lap-dancing club, having morphed into a decorative penis. Its familiar form presumably offers a reassuring sight for the attendant bankers who, the caption tells us, are strictly forbidden from enjoying any sort of "quantitative easing".

John Keats love letter fetches £96,000

A love letter sent by the Romantic poet John Keats fetched a record £96,000 at auction in London yesterday.

Sarkozy calls for bank 'Tobin tax'

The French President Nicolas Sarkozy opened his presidency of the G20 group of nations yesterday by calling for a $100bn (£62bn) tax on banks. The so-called "Tobin tax" on transactions has been championed by organisations such as Oxfam and the TUC, but the financial services industry vehemently opposes it.

City says it pays 11.2 per cent of Britain's taxes

The City of London yesterday sought to put a more positive sheen on its somewhat tarnished reputation, arguing that Britain's financial services industry last year accounted for more than £1 of every £10 raised by the Treasury in tax.

James Moore: For once the City's on the side of the angels

Outlook The proposal for an immigration cap was always going to prove to be one of the Conservative Party's dafter ideas. It might be the sort of thing that gets them going in the shires, but, as has been proved, it is fundamentally a crude and over simplistic measure for tackling a complex issue.

Business Diary: The train doesn't take the strain

Today's award for a nakedlyself-interested survey goes to CrossCountry trains, which reckons "cuts in the use of first-class train travel are costing UK businesses £15,624 in lost productivity per employee every year". The train company arrived at this remarkably precise figure by surveying 1,000 business folk – more than half of them said they had been stopped from using first-class train travel during the downturn and 70 per cent of those banned from the posh seats said they felt unable to work instandard carriages. Our hearts go out to them.

Business Diary: Fraser comment is a no-brainer

No doubt Stuart Fraser, abigwig in the City of London Corporation, felt he was among friends when speaking at a Conservative Party conference fringe meeting about the Cityyesterday. Still, it may not have been entirely wise to begin a defence of bankers' bonuses thus: "When God gave out brains, he didn't give them all out equally, and so we have to live in an unequal society."Naturally, his remarks are now doing the rounds of theblogosphere.

The Business on: Nick Anstee, Lord Mayor of London

I thought that blond bloke with the bikes ran our capital city?

Shares rise after levy is lighter than feared

Fears of punitive action prove unfounded as French and German governments pledge to follow Osborne's example

Now senior staff face action at London Met

A day after board governors resigned at London Metropolitan University over a £36m student funding scam, senior staff have learnt that they face the threat of suspension and disciplinary action.

Barclays boss warns of exodus of the bankers

Bob Diamond (who earns up to £40m a year) warns Government against supertax on bonuses
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Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable