Sebastian Coe

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Dedication to synthesisers

A composer with multiple Grammy nominations is set to receive belated recognition for her early Seventies work as an electronic music pioneer – thanks to the UK crate-digging label Finders Keepers. The keyboardist Suzanne Ciani was introduced to early synthesisers in the late sixties by designer Don Buchla, whose eponymous telephone exchange-style contraption defined Ciani's early sound.

Suzanne Ciani provided sound effects for the original version of The Stepford Wives

Finders Keepers reveals Suzanne Ciani's dedication to synthesisers

A composer with multiple Grammy nominations is set to receive belated recognition for her early Seventies work as an electronic music pioneer – thanks to the UK crate-digging label Finders Keepers. The keyboardist Suzanne Ciani was introduced to early synthesisers in the late sixties by designer Don Buchla, whose eponymous telephone exchange-style contraption defined Ciani's early sound.

Coca-Cola has kept its recipe a closely guarded secret for 125 years. It is thought to be known to only two people, who can’t fly together in case the plane crashes

Coke reveals its secret: It may need to carry a cancer warning

Drinks firm forced to change recipe in California after ingredient classed as health hazard

The end of popcorn economics

Cinemas are suffering as cash-strapped movie fans watch their pennies

Raise a glass to Gaultier

It's been quite a week for top jobs in fashion. After six months of speculation, Hedi Slimane's appointment as Yves Saint Laurent's new designer, replacing Stefano Pilati, was announced during Paris Fashion Week.

Last Night's Viewing: Daddy Daycare, Channel 4<br />Versailles, BBC2

"I get the feeling sometimes that the staff want us to fail," said Stefan, one of three men who featured in Daddy Daycare, a Channel 4 reality series designed to address a social crisis that almost certainly doesn't exist. I don't mean for a moment, by the way, that there are no incompetent or deadbeat fathers out there. Or that it isn't useful for even the most well-intentioned man to learn some lessons about childcare. But the implication that today's men are unusually bad at fatherhood ("Modern British life has spawned a generation of dysfunctional dads") is surely not true. Even the horror statistic used to underwrite this exercise in mental re-education could be seen from another angle as a silver lining: "Almost half of all mothers feel fathers don't do their share," said the voiceover at the beginning of the show. Really? You mean that as many as 50 per cent of mothers now feel fathers do? The truth of it was that it wasn't the staff at the south London nursery Stefan had been sent to who wanted him to fail. It was the production company. And even they only wanted him to fail a bit comically in the first half so that he could recover in the second, make a public act of contrition, and score a modest triumph before the final credits.

Pepsi to axe jobs in new war on Coca-Cola

Pepsi has promised to take the fight to its arch-rival Coca-Cola, with an extra $600m (£378m) marketing and advertising blitz.

Spotlight On... Indra Nooyi, chief executive, PepsiCo

The Cola Queen?

Lisa Markwell: Bathtimes of the rich and famous

FreeView from the editors at i

Masters of their domains

A new generation of web addresses is up for grabs. Will the big brands be tempted to splash out – and if so, will it just be to stop the labels falling into the wrong hands?

Cocal-Cola said its Glaceau water range used fruit juice; just three of eight flavours 'contain any form of fruit'

The real thing? Coca-Cola water rebuked for its health claims

Food giant's line of 'enhanced water' falls foul of critics at Children's Food Campaign

Diary: The jewel in Madonna's crown?

A pleasant diversion from the current nastiness is in store, courtesy of Madonna, whose eagerly awaited (if only because everyone expects it to be hilariously awful) Wallis Simpson biopic W.E. will finally get an airing at the Toronto Film Festival next month – once Harvey Weinstein has finished his reportedly extensive re-cut. Madonna's previous brushes with cinema have been less than well received (eg, Swept Away), but a Grazia magazine source has seen an early screening and claims the film is "very pretty" and "looks nice", both of which are up there with "the lighting was good" in the faint praise stakes. Moreover, Ms Madonna has taken a few liberties with the historical record: in the film, Mrs Simpson loses an unborn baby when she is assaulted by her first husband; King Edward spikes the drinks at a party to "ramp up the high-jinks factor"; and the former dances the twist for the latter as he lies on his deathbed. None of these incidents is believed to have occurred. Still, The King's Speech was criticised by some for its inaccuracies, and its director won an Oscar. Stranger things have happened. (Not many, though.)

Coca-Cola workers in 24-hour strike

Workers who transport cans of Coca-Cola across the country are to stage a 24-hour strike next week in a row over pay, it was announced today.

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