Reserve supply: US troops

Kajaki dam: The great white elephant of Afghanistan

Kabul government may struggle to run the dam in the former Taliban stronghold as American army begins withdrawal

Veterans 'died waiting' for Arctic Star medal

Scores of Arctic Convoy veterans have missed out on getting a new medal because they “died waiting” for Prime Minister David Cameron to act, the leading campaigner for recognition said.

Ben Emmerson QC, counsel for his widow, Marina, maintains that MI6 failed to protect its agent

Spanish link may shed light on motive for a very unusual, unexplained killing

In the world of espionage, where information is power, it is not unusual to find men like Alexander Litvinenko, a former agent, trading on what he could pick up from his contacts. Nor is it remarkable that his services were shared by his paymasters, MI6, with authorities in another friendly country, Spain.

Lomo: Shoot from the hip

It's analogue, has no autofocus – and no flash. And that's precisely why the Lomo is a cult camera, says Kate Burt

US military chiefs 'planned to blow up the moon with nuclear bomb' as show of Cold War muscle, physicist claims

Claims that military bosses developed a classified plan to launch a nuclear weapon 238,000 miles to the moon where it would be detonated upon impact

From elegant theory to infernal practice: ruins of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, after the atomic bomb of 6 August 1945

Inside the Centre: The Life of J Robert Oppenheimer, By Ray Monk

He was a poet, mystic, progressive - and the scientist who opened the gate of nuclear hell

A woman of contradictions: Han Suyin

Han Suyin: Author whose best-selling 'Many-Splendoured Thing' became a Hollywood hit

Han Suyin came to the notice of the Western world with her bestseller love story published in 1952, A Many-Splendoured Thing. The novel, an account of her affair in Hong Kong with the journalist Ian Morrison, was made into a film, Love is a Many Splendored Thing, starring Jennifer Jones and William Holden, in 1955, which won two Academy awards.

The nephew of North Korea’s new leader, Kim Jong-Un, has labelled his uncle a “dictator”

North Korea 'to shell tourists in South'

North Korea threatened yesterday to bombard a tourist area in South Korea with artillery shells if rights activists carry out their threat to shower the North with anti-Pyongyang leaflets.

The last bronze statue of Vladimir Lenin was dismantled in the capital, Ulan Bator

Ulan Bator says goodbye, Lenin

The last bronze statue of Vladimir Lenin was dismantled in the Mongolian capital, Ulan Bator, yesterday. The monument was hoisted off its plinth in a park and dropped on to a flat-bed lorry at a ceremony attended by the Mayor, Bat-Uul Erdene.

Invisible Ink, No 144: Desmond Bagley

This son of a Lancashire miner, born in 1923, grew up in a theatrical boarding house in Blackpool and started work at 14, servicing one-arm bandits along the Golden Mile. Prone to a debilitating stammer (later brought under control by a hypnotist), Desmond Bagley moved to South Africa to escape his difficult family and began writing radio scripts on science subjects.

East beats West: Bulgarian author Miroslav Penkov wins £15,000 short story award

Bulgarian author Miroslav Penkov has won the £15,000 BBC International Short Story Award for his story East of the West.

Leading article: Let’s not give up on the romance of space

The death of Neil Armstrong resonates so forcefully today not just because he was the first man on the Moon, and as such fulfilled so many vicarious dreams, or because his Moon landing seemed to clinch US victory in the Cold War space race. It is also because his life so closely mirrored the fortunes of the US space programme and his last decade was one in which Washington seemed to lose interest in conquering further frontiers.

Witness, World Service, Tuesday
Darwin's Tunes, Radio 4, Wednesday

How to make friends by thawing the Ice Curtain

Latest exam howlers are revealed

What was Stalin's key weapon in controlling Eastern Europe? Sausage rolls, according to one student.

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent