The lie of the land: Mapping the borders of South Sudan has been

Six months before South Sudan officially declared its independence, becoming the world's newest nation on 9 July, eight people met in an unremarkable boardroom in Glasgow over tea and biscuits to plot one of this fledgling country's most defining features – its borders.

'Pilgrimage' for Suu Kyi and son

Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese pro-democracy leader, ventured outside Rangoon yesterday for the first time since her release from house arrest.

Labour delivers blow to Clegg's Lords plans

Nick Clegg's plans to create an elected House of Lords suffered a big setback last night when Labour vowed to oppose the shake-up and peers from all parties lined up to attack it.

King of Morocco unveils constitutional reforms

Moroccan King Mohammed VI announced a series of constitutional reforms in a speech that he said will turn the North African country into a constitutional monarchy, though pro-democracy activists remain sceptical.

Transit, By Espen Rasmussen

The Norwegian photographer Espen Rasmussen has spent the past seven years documenting refugees and displaced people in different parts of the globe, from Congo to Colombia.

Essays, Volume 6: 1933-1941, By Virginia Woolf

Most writers are poor. Virginia Woolf, high priestess of modernism, had to earn her living like anybody else. These days, her kind of fiction, richly figurative, with her characters' narratives floating dreamily between inner and outer life, is not fashionable. During her lifetime, and until only recently, Woolf was hailed as a genius. Despite her success, however, she still had to make sure she could pay the bills. Her expenses, unlike ours perhaps, included paying for live-in domestic help (a difficult situation for both mistress and maid, brilliantly analysed by Alison Light in Mrs Woolf and the Servants).

Doctor Garret FitzGerald: Admired and respected politician whose

The former Foreign Secretary Dr David Owen once said that, if heads of government and foreign ministers were asked to name the most likeable politician, their overwhelming choice would be Garret FitzGerald. The same was true within Ireland, where he is remembered as the leading elder statesman of the last half-century, a figure who broadened the country's horizons and contributed to the eventual ending of the Troubles. Critics would often preface their comments with the admission that he was quite the nicest man in Irish politics. His sincerity, charm and lack of guile were legendary: in fact they help explain why his career was such a striking mixture of outstanding success and occasional failures.

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Inside Iran: What life is really like in Tehran

While revolution has been sweeping the Middle East, demonstrations in Iran have been more subdued. But what's really going on in this notoriously secretive state? In a special report from inside the country, Patrick Cockburn takes to the streets to find out