Congo

Otto von Habsburg: Last Crown Prince of Austria-Hungary who later

Otto von Habsburg was the eldest son of Austria-Hungary's last emperor and former heir to the imperial throne. He witnessed the dismantling of the empire his family had ruled for centuries, but emerged to carve out a career in politics and became a strong proponent of a united and democratic Europe.

Paris hails rebel advance as victory for Fifth Republic

French politicians of all colours were claiming the advance of the Libyan rebels as a national coup yesterday, with leaders from across the political spectrum issuing patriotic statements as the battle reached Muammar Gaddafi's compound.

Thousands turn out as Suu Kyi puts her freedom to the test

Thousands of well-wishers lined roadsides in Burma to welcome opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi yesterday as she tested the limits of her freedom by taking her first political trip into the countryside since being released from house arrest.

The lie of the land: Mapping the borders of South Sudan has been

Six months before South Sudan officially declared its independence, becoming the world's newest nation on 9 July, eight people met in an unremarkable boardroom in Glasgow over tea and biscuits to plot one of this fledgling country's most defining features – its borders.

'Pilgrimage' for Suu Kyi and son

Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese pro-democracy leader, ventured outside Rangoon yesterday for the first time since her release from house arrest.

Labour delivers blow to Clegg's Lords plans

Nick Clegg's plans to create an elected House of Lords suffered a big setback last night when Labour vowed to oppose the shake-up and peers from all parties lined up to attack it.

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Transit, By Espen Rasmussen

The Norwegian photographer Espen Rasmussen has spent the past seven years documenting refugees and displaced people in different parts of the globe, from Congo to Colombia.

Essays, Volume 6: 1933-1941, By Virginia Woolf

Most writers are poor. Virginia Woolf, high priestess of modernism, had to earn her living like anybody else. These days, her kind of fiction, richly figurative, with her characters' narratives floating dreamily between inner and outer life, is not fashionable. During her lifetime, and until only recently, Woolf was hailed as a genius. Despite her success, however, she still had to make sure she could pay the bills. Her expenses, unlike ours perhaps, included paying for live-in domestic help (a difficult situation for both mistress and maid, brilliantly analysed by Alison Light in Mrs Woolf and the Servants).