News

Market gossips turned their attention back to Tullow Oil yesterday, as rumours of possible bid interest from China prompted it to spurt up 34p to 1,109p on the blue-chip index.

Caught in the Net - A surgical strike from Annie Clark

"Surgeon", the new single from Annie Clark (below), better known as the artful US indie pop act St Vincent, is brilliantly strange.

US tusk smuggling operation cracked

A tonne of elephant tusks worth about $1m (£600,000) has been found in one of the largest ivory seizures in the US, and the owner of an African art store has been arrested on suspicion of smuggling them into the country.

Mohammad Usman Rana: Our multicultural democracy made us vulnerable

Figures show that Norway has a Muslim population of 120,000 to 150,000, yet there are no ghetto-like neighbourhoods such as in London and Bradford

Joan Smith: Ireland squares up to the Vatican

Last autumn, as Pope Benedict XVI celebrated an outdoor mass in Hyde Park, I joined a march through London to protest against his visit to the UK. It was boisterous and good-natured, but I was struck by the presence of a number of elderly women who seemed to be marching on their own.

UN report: Congo government troops blamed for mass rape

The United Nations named two Congolese army colonels who appear to blocking an investigation of soldiers accused of mass gang-raping at least 47 women in eastern Congo, and said if the attackers are not identified the officers themselves should stand trial for the crimes committed by the troopers under their command.

Edwards told he must pay for illegal affairs

The Federal Election Commission (FEC) approved a final audit yesterday that concludes former US presidential candidate John Edwards's campaign owes the government more than $2m.

The lie of the land: Mapping the borders of South Sudan has been fraught with difficulty

Six months before South Sudan officially declared its independence, becoming the world's newest nation on 9 July, eight people met in an unremarkable boardroom in Glasgow over tea and biscuits to plot one of this fledgling country's most defining features – its borders.

Suu Kyi marches in honour of her father

More than 3,000 democracy supporters led by Aung San Suu Kyi marched yesterday in Burma's biggest city in honour of her father, the nation's independence hero.

Debt 'vultures' win right to pursue $100m claim

Britain's effort to protect the world's poorest countries from international debt "vultures" appeared to be in tatters last night, after a US firm won a court ruling allowing it to pursue a $100m debt claim against the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Simon Calder: The key to safer travel - know your micromort

The man who pays his way

Archbishop attacks self-indulgence

The Archbishop of Canterbury has attacked "self indulgence" within the Church of England as he spoke of how his visit to the eastern Congo left him "wanting to be a Christian".

127 dead as plane crashes at airport

An airliner ploughed into dense forest as it tried to land during a rainstorm in the Democratic Republic of Congo yesterday, killing 127 people on board.

Passenger plane crashes in Congo

53 people were feared dead today after a plane crashed as it tried to land in bad weather at Kisangani airport in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, the Congolese airline operating the flight said.

Johann Hari: Would you trust a management consultant with the world's rainforests?

Our protests stopped David Cameron handing UK forests over to corporations. Now the rainforests are being handed to management consultants

'Pilgrimage' for Suu Kyi and son

Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese pro-democracy leader, ventured outside Rangoon yesterday for the first time since her release from house arrest.

News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

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What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

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The new hatched, matched and dispatched

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Honesty box hotels

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Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

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Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

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The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

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