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Market gossips turned their attention back to Tullow Oil yesterday, as rumours of possible bid interest from China prompted it to spurt up 34p to 1,109p on the blue-chip index.

Why Architecture Matters, By Paul Goldberger

This engaging explanation of "what buildings do beyond keeping us out of the rain" begins with a sideswipe at one of the great worthies of British architectural writing.

Pro-democracy activist on trial

Tomorrow, pro-democracy activists involved in the student demonstrations in December last year will appear at City of Westminster Magistrates Court.

Republican party reptile who feeds on liberals

The downfall of Anthony Weiner – he of the over-exposed torso – is another coup for Andrew Breitbart

Boundary change 'could cost Lib Dems quarter of MPs'

The Liberal Democrats could lose a quarter of their seats under boundary changes currently being drawn up by the Government, more than four times that of Labour, according to a new study.

The day the football world put the boot into England

As Blatter wins another term as Fifa president his backers attack the FA for daring to be critical

Ian Burrell: ‘Revolutions are fun. You come across the most incredible people’

Lindsey Hilsum, one of Britain’s bravest foreign correspondents, used to be a character in a Toni Morrison novel. At least, she worked under the pseudonym of Reba Linden, a name inspired by the book Song of Solomon.

Transit, By Espen Rasmussen

The Norwegian photographer Espen Rasmussen has spent the past seven years documenting refugees and displaced people in different parts of the globe, from Congo to Colombia.

Essays, Volume 6: 1933-1941, By Virginia Woolf

Most writers are poor. Virginia Woolf, high priestess of modernism, had to earn her living like anybody else. These days, her kind of fiction, richly figurative, with her characters' narratives floating dreamily between inner and outer life, is not fashionable. During her lifetime, and until only recently, Woolf was hailed as a genius. Despite her success, however, she still had to make sure she could pay the bills. Her expenses, unlike ours perhaps, included paying for live-in domestic help (a difficult situation for both mistress and maid, brilliantly analysed by Alison Light in Mrs Woolf and the Servants).

Fujimori campaign raises fears for democracy in Peru

Jailed autocrat's daughter is on course to take the presidency

£7bn richer: a good day at the office for Ivan Glasenberg

Jonathan Brown on the staggering flotation that made Glencore boss a multi-billionaire

Doctor Garret FitzGerald: Admired and respected politician whose efforts paved the way for the ending of the Troubles

The former Foreign Secretary Dr David Owen once said that, if heads of government and foreign ministers were asked to name the most likeable politician, their overwhelming choice would be Garret FitzGerald. The same was true within Ireland, where he is remembered as the leading elder statesman of the last half-century, a figure who broadened the country's horizons and contributed to the eventual ending of the Troubles. Critics would often preface their comments with the admission that he was quite the nicest man in Irish politics. His sincerity, charm and lack of guile were legendary: in fact they help explain why his career was such a striking mixture of outstanding success and occasional failures.

General who crushed Tutsi 'cockroaches' is jailed for 30 years

The Rwanda army chief who called for ethnic Tutsis to be exterminated like "cockroaches" during the 1994 genocide was yesterday sentenced to 30 years in prison.

2010 'a watershed year' for toppling governments

Repressive governments are launching a potentially disastrous fight back to stay in power following a tumultuous year in which technology was used across North Africa and the Middle East to topple dictatorships.

400,000 rapes in Congo in one year

More than 1,000 women are raped every day in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a US study shows.

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peopleStella McCartney apologises over controversial Instagram picture
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Laid bare: the Good2Go app ensures people have a chance to make their intentions clear about having sex
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Richard Burr remains the baker to beat on the Great British Bake Off
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Independent Travel
Apulia
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Lanzarote
Victoria Falls
Prices correct as of 26 September 2014
Italian couples fake UK divorce scam on an ‘industrial scale’

Welcome to Maidenhead, the divorce capital of... Italy

A look at the the legal tourists who exploited our liberal dissolution rules
Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

The vintage series has often been criticised for racial stereotyping
An app for the amorous: Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?

An app for the amorous

Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?
Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid. Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?

Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid

Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?
Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

After a few early missteps with Chekhov, her acting career has taken her to Hollywood. Next up is a role in the BBC’s gangster drama ‘Peaky Blinders’
She's having a laugh: Britain's female comedians have never had it so good

She's having a laugh

Britain's female comedians have never had it so good, says stand-up Natalie Haynes
Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LED lights designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows

Let there be light

Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LEDs designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows
Great British Bake Off, semi-final, review: Richard remains the baker to beat

Tensions rise in Bake Off's pastry week

Richard remains the baker to beat as Chetna begins to flake
Paris Fashion Week, spring/summer 2015: Time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris

A look to the future

It's time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris
The 10 best bedspreads

The 10 best bedspreads

Before you up the tog count on your duvet, add an extra layer and a room-changing piece to your bed this autumn
Arsenal vs Galatasaray: Five things we learnt from the Emirates

Arsenal vs Galatasaray

Five things we learnt from the Gunners' Champions League victory at the Emirates
Stuart Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

This deal gives England a head-start to prepare for 2019 World Cup, says Chris Hewett
Ebola outbreak: The children orphaned by the virus – then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection

The children orphaned by Ebola...

... then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection
Pride: Are censors pandering to homophobia?

Are censors pandering to homophobia?

US film censors have ruled 'Pride' unfit for under-16s, though it contains no sex or violence
The magic of roundabouts

Lords of the rings

Just who are the Roundabout Appreciation Society?