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Market gossips turned their attention back to Tullow Oil yesterday, as rumours of possible bid interest from China prompted it to spurt up 34p to 1,109p on the blue-chip index.

Liberty's Exiles, By Maya Jasanoff

Did anyone ever literally believe that God speaks English? One suspects not. But there are those who think the Goddess of Liberty does so, even if it was the French who first erected statues for her. There is a smallish but noisy transatlantic group of writers, politicians and think-tankers dedicated to the conviction that the values of freedom and democracy have their birthplaces and natural homes peculiarly – maybe even only – in what some of them call the Anglosphere. That term was popularised in 2004 by James Bennett, with his book The Anglosphere Challenge. It has been taken up by conservative historians like Niall Ferguson and, more stridently, Andrew Roberts, and by groups like the Social Affairs Unit. For a time, especially in the years of the Blair-Bush axis, it seemed to have some friends in very high places.

Government still failing on female representation

The dearth of women in government is as stark as in Britain's boardrooms, with just two out of 17 Cabinet committees overwhelmingly dominated by men and several of the most powerful including no women at all.

Soldiers jailed for mass rape as Congo finally acts on abuse

In a landmark case human rights activists hope will reduce a culture of impunity for sex crimes in the beleaguered central African country, a military court has convicted a lieutenant colonel in the Congolese army to 20 years' imprisonment for mass rapes committed on New Year's Day.

Congo colonel gets 20 years after rape trial

A Congolese court sentenced an army colonel to 20 years in prison today, convicting him of crimes against humanity in the highest-profile sexual violence case ever tried in a nation where thousands are brutally raped each year.

Councillors must vote on high earners

Councillors will have to vote in favour of awarding staff salaries of more than £100,000 under government plans announced yesterday.

Egypt revolt could help spread democracy says Blair

The ousting of Hosni Mubarak as Egypt's leader could prove a pivotal moment in spreading democracy across the Middle East, Tony Blair said today.

Court rejects fluoride challenge

A local health authority's plans for the fluoridation of a city's tap water was not unlawful, the High Court ruled today.

Six tiger reserve helpers kidnapped

Heavily armed men have kidnapped six volunteers from WWF-India who were counting the tiger population at a reserve in India's remote north-east, an official from the conservation group said yesterday.

How the West was Lost, By Dambisa Moyo

The rise and stall of the Chinese economy

Top junta figure to lead 'civilian' government

Burma's new parliament has named a key junta figure as its President, ensuring that the country's first "civilian" government in decades will be dominated by the army that has brutally suppressed dissent.

How tiny Nauru became world's fattest nation

Scientists warn of 'tsunami of obesity' as Western lifestyles spread across the globe

Freedom fighters, terrorists, democracy activists and looters

If there is one thing the uprisings in Tunisia and now in Egypt prove it is this; no matter how far you bend your back to appease your oppressor slash bank-roller, they will never hesitate to abandon you at the first sight of trouble.

Burmese parliament spells out its new 'democracy' reforms

Beneath the tiered roofs of Burma's ornate new parliament building in its remote capital, Naypyidaw, lawmakers will gather today for their first taste of "disciplined democracy" as prescribed by the country's military rulers.

The China syndrome: Year of the rabbit

As another Chinese New Year dawns this week, Jonathan Fenby assesses the world's second-biggest economic power - and charts the risks ahead

Court rejects Suu Kyi appeal on party break-up

Burma's highest court has rejected an appeal by the democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, to overturn a ruling dissolving her political party, which was ordered to disband during her long spell under house arrest.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence