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The festive season's a busy and tiring time which can take its toll on your skin. Cover up dark circles and blemishes with these clever concealers

Letter: Quotas will not redress injustice

THE PROBLEM I have with both New Labour's approach to racism and your recent article on racism in the workplace ("Still stuck on the shopfloor", 31 October) is the assumption that all will be well once we have quotas in every sphere of life where ethnic minorities and females are represented - ethnic minorities 7 per cent, females 50 per cent. The article suggests that we want to change the cultural make-up of the powerful few while the vast majority remains disenfranchised in our society.

4,500 to be axed in aluminium shake-up

THE THREE aluminium giants who will merge to create the world's largest aluminium company said yesterday that they would axe 4,500 jobs and close plants and sales offices to cut the enlarged group's annual costs by at least $600m (pounds 373m).

Leading Article: The gift of conception from beyond the grave

THE FIRST reaction to our report today that increasing numbers of children are being conceived by "fathers beyond the grave" is likely to be one of unease. There's an obvious danger that such children will be burdened by the feeling that they are human memorials to their dead fathers, from whose frozen sperm they have been posthumously conceived. But we should beware of being too judgmental about the motives of the mothers concerned. If they want to have a child who shares some of the genetic traits of a much-loved and mourned man, who is to say that is unhealthy, morbid or unwise? Any woman who makes such a decision, and whose partner has already given his written consent, or even stored some sperm, is likely to have given the issue serious thought. Indeed, they are likely to have given the question of bringing a child into the world more serious thought than many "ordinary" parents.

Fashion: Stop making sense

... because not everything in black and white does

Power companies to fight 20% cuts to household bills

ELECTRICITY COMPANIES are threatening to take the new energy regulator, Callum McCarthy, to the Competition Commission if he imposes a cut in household bills of more than 20 per cent in his forthcoming price review.

Going Down: Rentokil Initial

RENTOKIL INITIAL, the support-services company, said profits this year are likely to increase between 10 per cent and 15 per cent, below the company's 20 per cent target, as sales growth decelerates. The shares fell 25 per cent.

LETTER: Blonde bombshell

LETTER:

Is it worth it... Smeg fridge

How do you decide what makes a good fridge? Butter kept cold enough? Plenty of ice cubes? Most fridges can handle these simple requirements, but when you hanker after something extra special and it's what's on the outside that counts, take a look at the Smeg Fab30 fridge-freezer. It has Fifties-style rounded edges and a sturdy shape that's been combined with Nineties technology and comes in colours from vibrant red to pastel blue and beyond. Undoubtedly the best is the silver model, a gleaming obelisk that shines from the corner of your kitchen, hinting at Fifties space-age design.

Fashion: The history of... Lipstick - Lip-smacking good

BUYING A lipstick is the cheapest way to own a designer brand name, with Chanel, Versace and Dior all putting their names to luxurious make-up ranges. Decorating the face has been practised throughout the history of mankind by using the stains from plants and minerals or whatever was to hand.

Union must explain pounds 6m loss

Union must explain pounds 6m loss

Ousted Fisher chief's pounds 1.1m payoff

NEIL ENGLAND, ousted as chief executive of the Albert Fisher food group last month, is in line for a payoff of pounds 1.1m, it emerged yesterday. The sum will fuel the "rewards for failure debate" as Mr England presided over a halving of Albert Fisher profits and a share price collapse during his two-year tenure as chief executive.

Letter: Lessons of war?

Sir: Tim Field (letters, 13 November) should make up his mind. Either the Great War soldiers executed for cowardice were guilty, in which case a pardon (forgiveness for a wrong committed) is appropriate, or they were innocent, in which case a pardon (by confirming their guilt) would be a further slur on their reputations. Which does he want?

Eight Of The Best: lip glosses

Romance Lip Balm, pounds 4.95, Crabtree & Evelyn (mail order 01235 862244)

Fashion: 5 ways to wear - Red make-up

Putting on red lipstick, 'Harper's Bazaar' once declared, is an act that 'reinforces the spirit'. That was in 1946, but red is still the ultimate look-at-me colour. Its most recent incarnations, however - as eye-liner, mascara, blusher and eye-shadow - do demand a certain flair in application

Hot Thing: Coloured Mascara

EIGHTIES REVIVALISM is creeping back, but it's sharp rather than silly: more Brian Ferry than Boy George. Coloured mascara is everywhere, but the starting point was surely the McQueen Autumn/Winter show (pictured), with white faces, pink lashes and contact lenses. This "albino chic" is a little high-maintenance but many cosmetics companies have caught on and toned it down.
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones