Voices

It is a plaster that cannot heal the region's perpetual turmoil

Troops die on ground in Darfur as peacekeeping force suffers helicopter shortage

Helicopters desperately needed by peacekeepers in Darfur are flying in air shows and sitting in hangars across Europe, according to a new report.

Letters: Disabled patients

NHS must listen to the families of disabled patients

UN peacekeepers 'at breaking point'

United Nations peacekeeping forces are over-stretched, under-funded, and increasingly unable to protect the people they have been sent to help, a senior official has warned.

Letters: Teenagers in the forces

Britain's armed forces are no place to dump feral teenagers

Geoffrey Robertson: Peace in Darfur isn't possible without justice

The charge of genocide levelled this week against Sudan's President Bashir marks an anxious but important step for international justice. It will test not so much the fledgling International Criminal Court (ICC) as the integrity of the UN Security Council. It was the Council which set the justice process in motion, to cover its failure to stop mass murder in Darfur. Now it must stand by that process and require Sudan to respect the rule of international law that has resulted from it.

Leading article: Peace is more pressing than justice

If the International Criminal Court is to have any validity, it should be to pursue individuals such as President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan with charges of crimes against humanity. The court was set up in 2002 to bring to justice the perpetrators of precisely the sort of civilian massacre that we have witnessed in Darfur. In the five years since the uprising against Sudanese rule began in this province, over quarter of a million civilians have been killed and several million displaced. You can call it genocide or just plain slaughter. But the reality is there for all to see, and the complicity of the Sudanese government has been attested by virtually everyone who has been there.

African Union: Suspend Sudan genocide charge

The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court charged Sudan's President, Omar al-Bashir, with genocide yesterday, accusing him of masterminding a campaign to "destroy" three tribes in Darfur, killing 35,000 people and persecuting 2.5 million refugees.

Sudan's president charged with genocide

Sudan's president was charged with genocide today, accused of masterminding a campaign to wipe out entire tribes in the war-torn Darfur region.

President of Sudan 'likely to be indicted' for war crimes in Darfur

Aid agencies in Sudan were yesterday tightening security and preparing for a violent backlash if, as expected, the International Criminal Court indicts Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir for war crimes and crimes against humanity on Monday.

Seven peacekeepers killed in Darfur after ambush by gunmen

At least seven peacekeepers have been killed and more than 20 injured after a horde of 200 gunmen on horseback and in jeeps attacked the United Nations and African Union force in Darfur. It is the worst attack the new peace mission (Unamid) has suffered.

Asylum-seekers are sent back to Darfur

The ban on deporting asylum-seekers back to Darfur has been lifted by the Government despite warnings of widespread murder and torture of dissidents in the Sudanese region.

Negotiators quit Darfur, saying neither side is ready for peace

The UN negotiators attempting to bring peace to Darfur have resigned, admitting that their mission has been a failure.

<i>IoS</i> letters, emails & texts, 22 June 2008

Three major events took place recently. Parliament voted for 42 days internment, David Davis resigned in protest against the creeping database state, and Ireland rejected the Lisbon treaty. The media managed to get all three events wrong.

Can songs of peace bring harmony to strife-torn Darfur?

Khadija's singing used to stir Janjaweed militias to kill. Now she hopes to inspire them to lay down their guns

Darfur novelist returns personal narratives to the people he left behind

Daoud Hari translated the horrific accounts of militia victims. Now he has found his own voice
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable
Living with Alzheimer's: What is it really like to be diagnosed with early-onset dementia?

What is it like to live with Alzheimer's?

Depicting early-onset Alzheimer's, the film 'Still Alice' had a profound effect on Joy Watson, who lives with the illness. She tells Kate Hilpern how she's coped with the diagnosis