Voices

It is a plaster that cannot heal the region's perpetual turmoil

Troops die on ground in Darfur as peacekeeping force suffers helicopter shortage

Helicopters desperately needed by peacekeepers in Darfur are flying in air shows and sitting in hangars across Europe, according to a new report.

Letters: Disabled patients

NHS must listen to the families of disabled patients

UN peacekeepers 'at breaking point'

United Nations peacekeeping forces are over-stretched, under-funded, and increasingly unable to protect the people they have been sent to help, a senior official has warned.

Letters: Teenagers in the forces

Britain's armed forces are no place to dump feral teenagers

Geoffrey Robertson: Peace in Darfur isn't possible without justice

The charge of genocide levelled this week against Sudan's President Bashir marks an anxious but important step for international justice. It will test not so much the fledgling International Criminal Court (ICC) as the integrity of the UN Security Council. It was the Council which set the justice process in motion, to cover its failure to stop mass murder in Darfur. Now it must stand by that process and require Sudan to respect the rule of international law that has resulted from it.

Leading article: Peace is more pressing than justice

If the International Criminal Court is to have any validity, it should be to pursue individuals such as President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan with charges of crimes against humanity. The court was set up in 2002 to bring to justice the perpetrators of precisely the sort of civilian massacre that we have witnessed in Darfur. In the five years since the uprising against Sudanese rule began in this province, over quarter of a million civilians have been killed and several million displaced. You can call it genocide or just plain slaughter. But the reality is there for all to see, and the complicity of the Sudanese government has been attested by virtually everyone who has been there.

African Union: Suspend Sudan genocide charge

The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court charged Sudan's President, Omar al-Bashir, with genocide yesterday, accusing him of masterminding a campaign to "destroy" three tribes in Darfur, killing 35,000 people and persecuting 2.5 million refugees.

Sudan's president charged with genocide

Sudan's president was charged with genocide today, accused of masterminding a campaign to wipe out entire tribes in the war-torn Darfur region.

President of Sudan 'likely to be indicted' for war crimes in Darfur

Aid agencies in Sudan were yesterday tightening security and preparing for a violent backlash if, as expected, the International Criminal Court indicts Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir for war crimes and crimes against humanity on Monday.

Seven peacekeepers killed in Darfur after ambush by gunmen

At least seven peacekeepers have been killed and more than 20 injured after a horde of 200 gunmen on horseback and in jeeps attacked the United Nations and African Union force in Darfur. It is the worst attack the new peace mission (Unamid) has suffered.

Asylum-seekers are sent back to Darfur

The ban on deporting asylum-seekers back to Darfur has been lifted by the Government despite warnings of widespread murder and torture of dissidents in the Sudanese region.

Negotiators quit Darfur, saying neither side is ready for peace

The UN negotiators attempting to bring peace to Darfur have resigned, admitting that their mission has been a failure.

<i>IoS</i> letters, emails & texts, 22 June 2008

Three major events took place recently. Parliament voted for 42 days internment, David Davis resigned in protest against the creeping database state, and Ireland rejected the Lisbon treaty. The media managed to get all three events wrong.

Can songs of peace bring harmony to strife-torn Darfur?

Khadija's singing used to stir Janjaweed militias to kill. Now she hopes to inspire them to lay down their guns

Darfur novelist returns personal narratives to the people he left behind

Daoud Hari translated the horrific accounts of militia victims. Now he has found his own voice
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent