News The brothers, known for their catchphrase “To me, to you”, will sit it on lunchtime news conferences at Northern Echo

The brothers, known for their catchphrase “To me, to you”, will sit it on lunchtime news conferences at Northern Echo

Darlington enter administration

League Two play-off hopefuls Darlington have entered administration and will be deducted 10 points by the Football League.

Man dies after bite from Staffordshire bull terrier

A young father has died after being bitten on the elbow by a Staffordshire bull terrier as he walked to work.

Darlington

Secondary School Tables 2009

Man who enslaved lover is jailed

A self-styled "sex cult master" who walked girlfriends around on a dog lead was jailed for three years yesterday for forcing his lover to sleep with other men.

Swiss voters give boost to heroin on the NHS

Switzerland set to back radical plan to help addicts

Inside the hotel: 'There were bodies on the TV. Then they cut the signal'

He drank beers from the mini-bar, watched DVDs and did his best to convince his worried family that everything was all right. Then, having received the all-clear after spending 41 hours barricaded inside his hotel room, Paul Archer made plans to return again to India next week.

Dog saves owner from pervert

A pervert who made an obscene suggestion to a woman walking in a park was savaged by her Alsatian.

Have a Swale of a time walking in the Yorkshire's Dales

Walk of the Month: Walk one of Yorkshire's most dynamic waterways, says Mark Rowe

Forced marriages: the trail of misery and fear in Britain

A helpline for victims has been inundated with callers. Jerome Taylor was given exclusive access to their harrowing stories

Ancient seat of learning goes modern: Durham university is expanding into gritty towns

Forget Durham's image as a place for Oxbridge rejects to read Classics. The university is expanding into gritty towns such as Darlington – and planning vocational courses.

Five dead after storms lash UK

Emergency services launched an evacuation effort yesterday as the north of England was battered by another day of fierce rainstorms. Morpeth in Northumberland was hit by the worst floods the town has seen since the 1960s as riverbanks burst, forcing more than 300 people to leave their homes. Lifeboat teams joined the rescue. Three policemen attending the scene of a landslip near Alnwick had to be rescued themselves after a second slip left them stranded. More than 100 official flood warnings were still in place last night.

Letters: We need more small schools

You recently ran a positive article about small schools ("A school where less is more", EDUCATION & CAREERS, 17 July). US evidence reported to the National Education Trust, and confirmed in Australia, shows that as schools get larger, the gap between rich and poor widens.

Red Bull: it promises energy, but doesn't mention sticky blood...

Australian researchers have found that the sugar-free version of Red Bull may increase the danger of blood clots, and creates "sticky" blood, raising the risk of heart attack or stroke. How this affects the sales of Red Bull – last year 3.5 billion cans were sold in 143 countries – is yet to be seen.

The Ten Best Chutneys

Spice up your life with our choice of chutneys

Steam dreams: locomotives return to the tracks

After 40 years out of service, steam trains today return to Britain's tracks. Jonathan Brown, whose great-uncle drove the Flying Scotsman, takes his seat on the 'Tornado'
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine