David Miliband

Andy McSmith's Diary: Cameron is one of us, says French National Front

After the mixed reaction to David Cameron’s immigration speech this week, the Prime Minister might be pleased to know that a prominent French politician has heaped praise on it. “The speech by the British Prime Minister has smashed the taboo surrounding the unsustainable cost of immigration for European nations. At a time of mounting unemployment and widening deficits, it has become urgent to start giving priority to our own nationals in jobs, housing, social benefits and health,” he said.

Mary Dejevsky: A Miliband who still can't accept defeat

Let's hope, for his sake, that the Labour leader, Ed Miliband, is of an equable disposition, because in his place I would be hiring a posse of recidivist gang-members and sending them out on to the placid streets of Primrose Hill with a warning to big brother to "put up or shut up". Miliband D, as he came to be known during the long drawn-out contest for Labour leader, has been turning up recently in all sorts of places – not just the ones he is now being paid rather tidy sums to visit – and contributing, as he might see it, to the national conversation.

The Diary: Katori Hall; Dave Rowntree; Jesse Eisenberg; Martin Amis;

Katori Hall, whose Olivier-winning play The Mountaintop had its world premiere in Theatre 503 above a Battersea pub and is now preparing for an Autumn run on Broadway with Samuel L Jackson playing Martin Luther King, is back in London with a new play. Children of Killers is about life in post-genocide Rwanda as a group of teenagers prepare to meet their fathers – otherwise known as the men responsible for the atrocities – now released from prison and returning to the village. The play is one of 10 pieces of new writing to be performed at the end of the month by young people as part of the National Theatre Connections Festival. Other contributors include Samuel Adamson, Alia Bano (whose Gap sounds like a 21st-century take on The Beach and Lord of the Flies) and Noel Clarke, who has written Those Legs, a psychological drama about three pals struggling to come to terms with one of their gang losing the use of her legs after an accident.

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The Prime Ministers Who Never Were, Edited by Francis Beckett

When I was taught history we were told by our headmaster, no less, not to waste time on what he called "the what ifs of history". He reckoned that it was no good asking what would have happened if Anne Boleyn had agreed to sleep with Henry VIII out of wedlock, or if the plot to kill Hitler had succeeded, because no one knows and it is all idle speculation.

Sunderland sign Miliband to boost club's 'street cred'

Steve Bruce has had a tentative inquiry for England midfielder Stewart Downing rebuffed by Aston Villa, but is preparing to welcome another left winger to the Stadium of Light as David Miliband is set to join the club in a £50,000-a-year non-executive role following talks with chairman Niall Quinn.