i Philip Pullman, author

Say a little prayer for me?

Leading article: Just the start in tackling dementia

It is absolutely right that the Government is to double the spending on research into dementia. The disease is spreading so fast that there will soon be more than a million sufferers in the UK. And treating Alzheimer's, and similar problems, is already costing the NHS £23bn a year – more than cancer, heart disease or strokes.

David Cameron vows to double dementia funding

Funding for research into dementia is to be more than doubled by 2015 in a bid to make Britain a world leader in the field, David Cameron announced today.

Best Friends: Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan exchange confidences and laughter in The Trip, and we love to listen in

The Listening Project: Yes, it's good to talk. But the real joy is in being allowed to listen

As the BBC airs intimate conversations, project deviser Tony Phillips finds he is deeply moved

Alzheimer’s treatment in late stages of disease does slow progression

More than 100,000 people in the UK suffering the “savage” effects of advanced Alzheimer’s disease could benefit from drug treatment to slow its progression.

Chemical link revealed in Alzheimer's study

Alzheimer's symptoms such as memory loss could be prevented by targeting a chemical that dismantles brain connections, research suggests.

Ex-care workers jailed for thefts

Two former care home workers who "fleeced" vulnerable patients of tens of thousands of pounds were jailed today.

New York Philharmonic Orchestra/ Gilbert, Barbican Hall

For the New York Philharmonic to have embarked upon a London residency without Mahler in their portfolio would have been unconscionable.

Cash crisis slows justice for the vulnerable at Court of Protection

Hundreds of vulnerable people seeking court decisions about where they live or whom they can meet could experience months of delays because the government expert protecting their interests has almost run out of money, The Independent can disclose.

Switzerland's 'Dementiaville' designed to mirror the past

Plan to build 1950s-style village for Alzheimer's sufferers divides geriatric-care experts

Brief encounter: Jonathan Brown wears distorting glasses, noisy headphones and neoprene mittens to experience what life is like for people living with dementia

Dementia: A small taste of hell on earth

Dementia affects hundreds of thousands of people in the UK, yet few know how it feels. A new awareness course aims to help us to find out

Superficially similar, but the Iron Lady had a quality that Streep lacks

Iron Lady film made too soon, says David Cameron

David Cameron today stepped in to the row over the Iron Lady, claiming the film should have been made "another day".

Oscar winner Meryl Streep, left, transformed for her role as former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, right

Portrait too blue to be true

There is one very good reason to see The Iron Lady, perhaps good enough to neutralise the reasons to feel annoyed by it. Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher gives a performance of uncanny exactitude and command that overleaps the bounds of mimicry: despite a face encrusted with prosthetics and make-up, Streep somehow conveys through outward presentation (clothes, hair, voice) the inward drive of her personality. Strictly as an impersonation it will be seen as definitive for years to come.

The Iron Lady (12A)

Starring: Meryl Streep, Richard E Grant, Jim Broadbent, Anthony Head

Among those aged 45-49, there was a 3.6 per cent decline in mental reasoning over the next 10 years

Life ends at 45... Study reveals when our mental powers start to diminish

Huge survey carried out on Whitehall civil servants shows our brains peak earlier that we think

Leading article: An issue of dignity that can no longer be avoided

Even with all the benefits of medicine, the terminally ill may face extreme pain and indignity
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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence