News

While politicians agonise over the size of the Government’s debt, one of the most expensive publicly funded projects in recent years is quietly getting under way.

CPS handed file on Red Arrows death after pilot was ejected from cockpit while on the ground

Police have passed a file to the Crown Prosecution Service after a Red Arrows aerial display team pilot died after he was ejected from his cockpit while on the ground.

A Syrian rebel aims his weapon during clashes with government forces in the streets near Aleppo international airport in northern Syria on 4 March 2013

Russia warns Britain against plan to arm Syrian rebels

Any attempt by Britain to arm the Syrian rebels would be a breach of international law, Russia warned today.

Steuart Pittman: Official who tried to equip the US with fall-out shelters

Steuart Pittman once described his job as among the most "unappetising, unappealing and unpopular" ever devised for man – having to endlessly warn of the horrors of a nuclear war, yet simultaneously to convince his fellow citizens that if they were prepared to live like troglodytes, the ordeal could be survived.

Ripon fears economic blow as Claro barracks closes after a century

The closure of Claro barracks in Ripon will put an end to a military association dating back to before the First World War.

Philip Hammond denied being in “conflict” with George Osborne

Danny Alexander rebukes Defence Secretary Philip Hammond in Cabinet over opposition to MoD cuts

Cabinet divisions over public spending surfaced today when Philip Hammond, the Defence Secretary, was slapped down for opposing more cuts in his department.

Maj Gen Tony Deane-Drummond: Soldier decorated after Operation Market Garden

Tony Deane-Drummond was one of the architects of the modern SAS, which received the acclaim he desired for it in January 1959 after it won the battle of the Green Mountain in Oman. The A and D squadrons of his command, 22 SAS Regiment seized the 7,000ft Jebel Akhdar, stronghold of the rebels Suleiman bin Hamyar and his brother Talib, who with their wives, slaves, carpets, and other possessions operated from caves and tunnels in the craggy heights to oppose Britain's ally, the Sultan. Around 120 men surprised rebel forces of about 500 by climbing a pathless, sheer face, unnoticed. The SAS lost three men, the rebels more than 50. The mountain's capture prompted politicians to see the SAS's value as a tool of post-imperial policy, and military chiefs to appreciate its adaptability.

Nato may keep 12,000 troops in Afghanistan

Nato countries are considering keeping up to 12,000 troops in Afghanistan after 2014, the date when foreign combat forces were due to leave the war-torn country.

Aid budget cash 'should go on hospitals and not helicopter gunships'

Charities angry over plan to divert hundreds of millions from aid budget to Ministry of Defence

If more money is needed for peacekeeping, Government should collect it by tackling tax avoidance

We shouldn't use money from the aid budget to subsidise military operations

David Cameron visits the Golden Temple in Amritsar

Foreign-aid cash could be used to pacify war zones, says David Cameron

Money earmarked for foreign aid could be switched to the Ministry of Defence in an attempt to focus more resources on bringing peace and stability to warzones, David Cameron has signalled.

David Cameron pushes Tycoon contract as Indian PM airs concerns over Anglo-Italian helicopter firm AgustaWestland 'corruption'

Allegations threaten £500m deal for AgustaWestland to transport VIPs

Snatch Land Rovers were withdrawn from combat zones because they were so vulnerable

Troops’ right to life same as civilians, court told

Snatch Land Rovers were withdrawn from combat zones because they were so vulnerable

Families of dead soldiers go to court

Families of soldiers who died in attacks on the British army's lightly armoured Snatch Land Rovers in Iraq will fight for compensation in the Supreme Court tomorrow.

Benjamin Britten at the Royal Festival Hall, London, holding the score of his cantata 'Voices For Today'

Benjamin Britten and the Ministry of Defence censors

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has refused to release footage for a major new documentary about Benjamin Britten because the composer was a pacifist and a “deserter”, an award-winning film-maker has claimed.

RAF investigates 1980s child abuse claims

Alleged offences committed at base in Germany

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Ebola outbreak: The children orphaned by the virus – then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection

The children orphaned by Ebola...

... then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection
Pride: Are censors pandering to homophobia?

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US film censors have ruled 'Pride' unfit for under-16s, though it contains no sex or violence
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A good time to open a new restaurant in Hong Kong?

As pro-democracy demonstrators hold firm, chef Rowley Leigh, who's in the city to open a new restaurant, says you couldn't hope to meet a nicer bunch
Paris Fashion Week: Karl Lagerfeld leads a feminist riot on 'Boulevard Chanel'

Paris Fashion Week

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Bruce Chatwin's Wales: One of the finest one-day walks in Britain

Simon Calder discovers Bruce Chatwin's Wales

One of the finest one-day walks you could hope for - in Britain
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Make sure the kids stay cosy on cooler autumn nights in this selection of pjs, onesies and nighties
Manchester City vs Roma: Five things we learnt from City’s draw at the Etihad

Manchester City vs Roma

Five things we learnt from City’s Champions League draw at the Etihad
Martin Hardy: Mike Ashley must act now and end the Alan Pardew reign

Trouble on the Tyne

Ashley must act now and end Pardew's reign at Newcastle, says Martin Hardy
Isis is an hour from Baghdad, the Iraq army has little chance against it, and air strikes won't help

Isis an hour away from Baghdad -

and with no sign of Iraq army being able to make a successful counter-attack
Turner Prize 2014 is frustratingly timid

Turner Prize 2014 is frustratingly timid

The exhibition nods to rich and potentially brilliant ideas, but steps back
Last chance to see: Half the world’s animals have disappeared over the last 40 years

Last chance to see...

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Hacked photos: the third wave

Why can no one stop hackers putting celebrities' private photos online?