Voices 19 November 2013: A man walks down steps from a tanker that was washed ashore in a particularly badly damaged part of Tacloban during Typhoon Haiyan in Leyte, Philippines

They appear to have become infected with malaise that infects the City; to get bright, talented people to do important jobs they need to be paid ridiculous salaries

Firm fined after worker's lift shaft death

A company was ordered to pay £45,000 in a fine and costs at the Old Bailey today after a fitter was crushed to death in a lift accident.

David Cameron's pledge to 'shattered' communities

David Cameron pledged today to do everything possible to help communities "shattered" by the killing spree in Cumbria as he revealed that at least five people had died.

Snooker: Hearn turns to O'Sullivan as ally in battle for player loyalty

Barry Hearn has moved to shore up his most prized playing asset, Ronnie O'Sullivan, ahead of a crucial player vote on Wednesday that will decide snooker's future.

Government defends £6.2bn spending cuts

The Government today defended £6.2 billion of spending cuts announced on Monday as necessary to tackle the "economic mess" inherited from Labour.

Morning-after pill 'should be offered in advance'

Young women should be given access to the morning-after pill to keep at home in case they need it, a watchdog said today.

Gigs postponed after Bono's emergency op

U2 were forced to postpone the next leg of their world tour after singer Bono injured his back, the band said tonight.

A Gate at the Stairs, By Lorrie Moore

The landlocked Midwest is an uncompromising place to live. In this novel by Lorrie Moore, there's a sense that she has wrung every last drop of mirth and meaning from dispiriting surroundings. The author of three celebrated short-story collections and two previous novels, including the memorably titled Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?, Moore returns after an 11-year intermission with a masterly work that examines how Americans have educated themselves to endure the unendurable. The novel's narrator, 20-year old Tassie Keltjin, has just enrolled at Troy university, "the Athens of the Midwest". The daughter of a Lutheran farmer and a Jewish mother, she's hungry for enlightenment. Engaged by her classes (Intro to Sufism and a module in war-movie soundtracks) and happily scandalised by her roommate's warped jokes, Tassie has never eaten Chinese takeaway or seen a man wear a tie with jeans. Her life gets yet more piquant when she accepts a child-minding job with a glamorous local couple. Sarah and Edward are only part-way through the adoption process – her charge is yet to exist - and Tassie comes to understand she's a witness to a stage-managed act whose true complexity will only revealed as the novel progresses.

Fostering: How making new children feel at home can be a family affair

Being a foster carer can have a positive impact on one's own children as well.

Ten great eco-products

Here are ten great products to help you stay as eco-friendly as possible:

DVD: The Road (15)

It is a dark day when a man is starving, hounded by the threat of cannibals, and has two bullets left in his gun for some final, fatal emergency – one for himself and one for his young son. The third novel from acclaimed US author Cormac McCarthy to be filmed, this impressive work adapted by British playwright Joe Penhall and directed by John Hillcoat is a chilling tale of loneliness and survival which, at times, dips into the horrific.

Russian coal mine death toll rises to 60

The death toll from a Siberian coal mine disaster at the weekend rose to 60 today when rescue workers found eight bodies, Russian officials said.

Death toll in Russian mine blasts hits 30

The death toll from two explosions in Russia's largest underground coal mine rose today to 30, with about 60 people still trapped, state media reported, citing the government official heading the rescue operation.

7/7 victim 'might have been saved'

A mother who was killed in the 7 July terrorist attacks in London remained alive for 45 minutes after the blast and might have survived with "timely treatment", a court heard yesterday. The family of Behnaz Mozakka, 47, only found out a fortnight ago that the biomedical officer at Great Ormond Street Hospital had not been killed instantly in the attacks which claimed the lives of 52 people in 2005.

Gymnastics: Keatings claims Euro gold as GB hit new heights

Daniel Keatings gave further evidence of Britain's emergence into the top rank of gymnastic nations leading a home one-two at the European Championships in Birmingham yesterday.

Italian Shoes, By Henning Mankell

Frederick Welin is the sole inhabitant of an island off the coast of Sweden. He speaks to no one but the postman, and little enough to him. Every day he cuts a hole in the ice near the jetty and jumps into the freezing water; a rite of self-mortification that makes him feel, briefly, alive. Then, one morning, he sees a figure struggling across the ice towards his house – a woman he has not seen for 30 years...

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Where the spooks get their coffee fix: The busiest Starbucks in the US is also the most secretive

The secret CIA Starbucks

The coffee shop is deep inside the agency's forested Virginia compound
Revealed: How the Establishment closed ranks over fallout from Loch Ness Monster 'sighting'

How the Establishment closed ranks over fallout from Nessie 'sighting'

The Natural History Museum's chief scientist was dismissed for declaring he had found the monster
One million Britons using food banks, according to Trussell Trust

One million Britons using food banks

Huge surge in number of families dependent on emergency food aid
Excavation at Italian cafe to fix rising damp unearths 2,500 years of history in 3,000 amazing objects

2,500 years of history in 3,000 amazing objects

Excavation at Italian cafe to fix rising damp unearths trove
The Hubble Space Telescope's amazing journey, 25 years on

The Hubble Space Telescope's amazing journey 25 years on

The space telescope was seen as a costly flop on its first release
Did Conservative peer Lord Ashcroft quit the House of Lords to become a non-dom?

Did Lord Ashcroft quit the House of Lords to become a non-dom?

A document seen by The Independent shows that a week after he resigned from the Lords he sold 350,000 shares in an American company - netting him $11.2m
Apple's ethnic emojis are being used to make racist comments on social media

Ethnic emojis used in racist comments

They were intended to promote harmony, but have achieved the opposite
Sir Kenneth Branagh interview: 'My bones are in the theatre'

Sir Kenneth Branagh: 'My bones are in the theatre'

The actor-turned-director’s new company will stage five plays from October – including works by Shakespeare and John Osborne
The sloth is now the face (and furry body) of three big advertising campaigns

The sloth is the face of three ad campaigns

Priya Elan discovers why slow and sleepy wins the race for brands in need of a new image
How to run a restaurant: As two newbies discovered, there's more to it than good food

How to run a restaurant

As two newbies discovered, there's more to it than good food
Record Store Day: Remembering an era when buying and selling discs were labours of love

Record Store Day: The vinyl countdown

For Lois Pryce, working in a record shop was a dream job - until the bean counters ruined it
Usher, Mary J Blige and Will.i.am to give free concert as part of the Global Poverty Project

Mary J Blige and Will.i.am to give free concert

The concert in Washington is part of the Global Citizen project, which aims to encourage young people to donate to charity
10 best tote bags

Accessorise with a stylish shopper this spring: 10 best tote bags

We find carriers with room for all your essentials (and a bit more)
Paul Scholes column: I hear Manchester City are closing on Pep Guardiola for next summer – but I'd also love to see Jürgen Klopp managing in England

Paul Scholes column

I hear Manchester City are closing on Pep Guardiola for next summer – but I'd also love to see Jürgen Klopp managing in England
Jessica Ennis-Hill: 'I just want to give it my best shot'

Jessica Ennis-Hill: 'I just want to give it my best shot'

The heptathlete has gone from the toast of the nation to being a sleep-deprived mum - but she’s ready to compete again. She just doesn't know how well she'll do...