News Alex Salmond said his government believed that independence would lead to a new industrial strategy

An independent Scotland's ability to use tax powers, including a cut in corporation tax , would lead to a "jobs boom" and end Westminster's "one size fits all" economics policies, Scotland's First Minister has claimed.

Open Eye: Government will review Scots funding for the OU

The Government has agreed to review the arrangements for funding the Open University's teaching in Scotland in response to a request from the OU.

Just journalism left as jute joins jam

BRITAIN'S JUTE industry, which shaped the city of Dundee and forged one of the nation's grittiest working-class communities, will reach the point of no return this week.

Searching for ways to break the class cycle

How can we encourage children from poorer families to reap the benefits of higher education?

Football: Mystery as Leighton retires from Scotland

JIM LEIGHTON yesterday turned his back on international football, despite pleas from the Scotland camp for the 40-year-old Aberdeen goalkeeper to reconsider his decision.

Education - Letter: Scottish example

I read Lucy Hodges' article ("Above and beyond for A-levels", Education, 24 September) concerning the future of English sixth forms with an ever- growing sense of familiarity, for the system described was almost identical to what I experienced in my Scottish school. It appears that the problems discussed can be, at least partly, resolved by reference to the Scottish system. Would life be easier for the new breed of sixth formers? Certainly not, if my experience in Scotland is anything to go by; fifth year (lower sixth), when about five Highers are taken, is undeniably stressful, since there is only one year to cover the syllabus and prepare for the exams - emphatically different things. Yet it is clear that - to answer Professor Chris Robson's point - five or even six subjects can successfully be "fitted in" in terms of both teaching and examination. On the other hand, since Highers are the "official" school-leaving exams, sixth year (upper sixth) is considerably less pressured, allowing the further specialisation involved in A-level without the sheer terror of knowing one's results will count for everything.

Forth Docks sets date for Britannia

THE COMPANY awarded custody of the former Royal Yacht Britannia yesterday claimed it was well placed to handle any economic downturn.

Britain's tiger economy is Worthing

ENVY THE lucky traders and business people of Worthing.

Surgeon's work was queried months ago

MANAGERS AT a hospital in Scotland where a surgeon was suspended following the death of one of his patients disclosed yesterday that concerns had been raised about his operating technique for months.

Taste of Scotch life a heady experience

Soaring peaks, beautiful cities and choice whiskys - Scotland is sure to delight the senses. And its many good universities make it a sensible option, writes John Izbicki

Prince's Trust faces wall death charges

THE PRINCE'S Trust is to be prosecuted over the deaths of two young men following an accident on the Orkney islands last year.

Politics: Left-wing rejects fight Labour `cull'

SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT

Welcome to Scotland the Brava

Global warming could bring more than a ray of sunshine to northern resorts such as Arbroath, reports Mark Rowe

Theatre review: Sea Urchins Dundee Rep: What they did on their holidays

The shading of innocence into experience, and the inter-generational dynamics through which this eternal transition is played out, have formed a recurrent preoccupation of Sharman Macdonald's work. Best-known in this respect is her much-feted debut, When I Was A Girl I Used to Scream and Shout, and The Winter Guest, from which she co-adapted her original script for Alan Rickman's recent hit film.

Freed women face nursing council probe

THE two nurses are to be investigated by the governing body for nurses in Britain. The United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing said it was investigating a complaint made by the Labour MP George Galloway, that the nurses should not be allowed to work again, writes Andrew Buncombe.

Nurses fly in to 'blood money' row

THE TWO nurses freed from a murder sentence in Saudi Arabia were due to arrive home today as one of their lawyers said he planned to contest half the pounds 750,000 "blood money" payment.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
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Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?