News

Struggling Hovis is to get £200 million of investment under a deal that will hand a major slice of the operation to an American firm.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: If we close our borders, we close our minds

A fear creeps up on me. I hear my late mother's exhortative voice, her frequent warnings: "Don't show your anger to them. They will take away your passport. Then where will you go?" They are those faceless men and women with the power to decide who may enter this country, who has citizenship, who can be incarcerated, handcuffed and thrown back to their sad badlands. The millions of migrants in this country have ingested the message. We are here on sufferance and must never forget that. Capricious new regulations could whip away our hard-earned rights at any time. As the uber-patriot Norman Tebbit once told me on the Today programme, we may have British passports but can never really belong. Last year at Heathrow airport, for reasons that remain unexplained, I was escorted away for a long interview with two non-uniformed men whose tone and manner left me feeling so afraid and helpless I wet myself. All my brio dissolved into piddle. Not funny.

Kaleem Aftab: Gurinder and me

When the Bride and Prejudice director agreed to give The Independent's Kaleem Aftab a role in her new movie, it was an offer he couldn't refuse

Hamant Verma: The British Indian approach to business can help us escape recession

British Indians have a conservative culture, with a small "c", which means they are sceptical of change, resourceful and austere – perfect for dealing with a recession. While the regular sight of an Indian housewife parking a large new Mercedes saloon outside one of Ealing Road's modest vegetarian restaurants probably looks ostentatious to indigenous Brits, shrewd Desis will have the nagging feeling that her husband could probably have afforded a bigger one if he wanted.

Two in court over severed hand murder

A man is due to appear at the Old Bailey today charged with killing his estranged wife who was found with injuries including a severed hand.

Murder victim's ex-husband arrested

The estranged husband of murdered mother-of-two Geeta Aulakh was re-arrested by detectives today.

Teenager charged over mutilation murder

A teenager was today charged with the murder of a mother-of-two who was left dying and mutilated in the street, police said.

Joan Smith: Modernity – an end to male-run faiths and 'honour' crimes

When demonstrators gathered in London yesterday to protest against sharia, the Archbishop of Canterbury was otherwise engaged with the Pope. It's almost two years since Rowan Williams caused an outcry when he suggested that recognising aspects of sharia would help social cohesion, and, every day, evidence accumulates to show how wrong he was. Women, girls and young men desperately need protection from religious laws and the patriarchal attitudes associated with them, as two ghastly events demonstrated last week.

Murdered woman's hand was cut off

The estranged husband of a woman who was left dying in the street with one of her hands cut off has been arrested. Geeta Aulakh, 28, was found in Greenford, north-west London.

Gordon Brown: New rules can make our immigration system tougher and fairer

We live in a fast-changing world – and government must change to meet the new challenges. Our immigration system is a very clear example.

Police issue appeal over missing girl

Police today appealed for information about a 10-year-old Indian girl who was brought to the UK by her aunt against her parents' wishes and has since disappeared.

Rappers used song to scare off murder witnesses

Two rappers were convicted today of trying to scare off witnesses to a murder in a song placed on the internet.

'Devil in a dog collar' jailed for child sex attacks

A Roman Catholic priest referred to as the "devil in a dog collar" was jailed for eight years today over a string of sex attacks on young boys.

EMI Records: a history in music

They dominated the British music industry for half a decade, but how did EMI Records get there? And what factors contributed to their extraordinary decline?

Doctor Aidan Southall: Urban anthropologist who pioneered the study of African cities

Aidan Southall helped invent urban anthropology, was a pioneer in the study of African cities and became a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain – because of a banana boat.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

Auschwitz liberation 70th anniversary

Woman sent to three Nazi death camps describes surviving gas chamber
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea