Why are they famous? Anthea Turner

MAIN CLAIM: TV's golden girl with a grin. The Goody Two Shoes, all-the-family presenter with a rictus sufficiently vice-like to give male viewers nightmares of the Freudian variety has suddenly come over all scarlet womanly with her open affair with a married man. Her romance with tycoon father of three, Grant Bovey, 36, a pal of Turner's husband and manager Peter Powell, has had all the elements of a large print classic. Now thought to be in hiding, Turner has irrevocably soiled - indeed somewhat razzed up - her simpering, fun-free image.

Motoring: My Worst Car/Eamonn Holmes'S Fiat 124

Every time I get into a car and sniff a pine tree-shaped air freshener it reminds me of my first and probably worst car. You see, I needed four of them to take away the terrible smell of damp that polluted my old Fiat 124.

My life as a priest

Father Ted may have been Dermot Morgan's passport to fame and fortune on both sides of the Irish Sea, but as James Rampton finds out, it has not softened his uncompromising views on the Church

We know it's only rock and goal, but we like it

Sport on TV

TELEVISION : Messages from the beige conservatory

LEGAL NOTE: - After legal action from Kilroy-Silk, we have undertaken not to repeat the allegation that Kilroy and his company rip off the public and guests by using premium telephone lines.

David Aaronovitch His lips are sealed: John Major remains obstinately evasive on the subject of Europe, despite a grilling from John Humphrys during last Sunday's `On the Record' (BBC1)

Foxtrot on the wing and not a fowl in sight

Sport on TV

how to be a tv presenter

If you're hell-bent on becoming famous, the most obvious course to take nowadays is that of the television presenter. Forget about spending years in a malodorous garret perfecting a novel; as a TV presenter you get beamed into the unsuspecting living rooms of millions of punters at once. And, with the riotous escalation of satellite, there's no shortage of celebrity pie to go round.

Dear Michael Jackson

So you've just released your first single for two years. It has lots of sirens and breaking glass in it. And as for the lyrics ... a former fan wonders what's going on in your head

Soothing start enlivened by Motivator

'TAKE THAT - are they too raunchy?' Apparently so for Graham and Susan Walker, who had treated their daughter Lucy to concert tickets for her eighth birthday. But so appalled were they by newspaper reports of the group's flirtation with erotica that they stopped her from going.

GMTV wins reprieve after improvement in services: Better news coverage helps station described by watchdog as 'poor' escape fine. Rhys Williams reports

GMTV has avoided a possible pounds 2m fine and the shortening of its 10- year broadcasting licence after the Independent Television Commission found yesterday that it had made a 'demonstrable improvement' in its services.

TELEVISION / Long Runners: No 35: Through the Keyhole

Age: seven. First broadcast 3 April 1987; recently celebrated its 100th episode with a Jane Asher cake in the shape of a house.

Putt it away: Leslie Neilsen brings you a new sport on video - spoof golf. Owen Slot talks bad backswings with the champion of 'dumb' humour

Last Tuesday, Leslie Nielsen sat on the GMTV couches, embarrassing Eamonn Holmes by making farting noises in front of the cameras. Nielsen was there to promote his new video, Bad Golf Made Easier, but the combination of the comic video clips, his hallmark straight-faced silliness and the schoolboy parping seemed to put his whole repartee up for scrutiny.

Media: Who do you want to wake up with?: Channel 4 feeds us snap, crackle and pop, while BBC1 sticks to news. How should GMTV compete? Martin Wroe on the battle for breakfast ratings

FORGET News at Ten. Forget BBC1's problems in recovering the mid-evening audience lost by Wogan and Eldorado. The fiercest battle for viewers this autumn will take place while a significant proportion of the nation is still in bed.

Media: Switching on, off and over

IN ITS first six months, GMTV lost pounds 268 every minute it was on the air. Advertisers wondered about a station whose younger viewers were fleeing in droves to Channel 4's The Big Breakfast. Whatever costs are cut, ITV's early- morning company cannot be healthy until audiences rise.
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General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

In an exclusive interview, Ed Balls says he won't negotiate his first Budget with SNP MPs - even if Labour need their votes to secure its passage
VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
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A new typeface once took years to create, now thousands are available at the click of a drop-down menu. So why do most of us still rely on the old classics, asks Meg Carter?
Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics - it's everywhere in the animal world

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Voting, mutual back-scratching, coups and charismatic leaders - it's everywhere in the animal world
Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

Crisp sales are in decline

As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

Ronald McDonald the muse

A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
13 best picnic blankets

13 best picnic blankets

Dine al fresco without the grass stains and damp bottoms with something from our pick of picnic rugs
Barcelona 3 Bayern Munich 0 player ratings: Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?

Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?
Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

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Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'