Why are they famous? Anthea Turner

MAIN CLAIM: TV's golden girl with a grin. The Goody Two Shoes, all-the-family presenter with a rictus sufficiently vice-like to give male viewers nightmares of the Freudian variety has suddenly come over all scarlet womanly with her open affair with a married man. Her romance with tycoon father of three, Grant Bovey, 36, a pal of Turner's husband and manager Peter Powell, has had all the elements of a large print classic. Now thought to be in hiding, Turner has irrevocably soiled - indeed somewhat razzed up - her simpering, fun-free image.

Motoring: My Worst Car/Eamonn Holmes'S Fiat 124

Every time I get into a car and sniff a pine tree-shaped air freshener it reminds me of my first and probably worst car. You see, I needed four of them to take away the terrible smell of damp that polluted my old Fiat 124.

My life as a priest

Father Ted may have been Dermot Morgan's passport to fame and fortune on both sides of the Irish Sea, but as James Rampton finds out, it has not softened his uncompromising views on the Church

We know it's only rock and goal, but we like it

Sport on TV

TELEVISION : Messages from the beige conservatory

LEGAL NOTE: - After legal action from Kilroy-Silk, we have undertaken not to repeat the allegation that Kilroy and his company rip off the public and guests by using premium telephone lines.

David Aaronovitch His lips are sealed: John Major remains obstinately evasive on the subject of Europe, despite a grilling from John Humphrys during last Sunday's `On the Record' (BBC1)

Foxtrot on the wing and not a fowl in sight

Sport on TV

how to be a tv presenter

If you're hell-bent on becoming famous, the most obvious course to take nowadays is that of the television presenter. Forget about spending years in a malodorous garret perfecting a novel; as a TV presenter you get beamed into the unsuspecting living rooms of millions of punters at once. And, with the riotous escalation of satellite, there's no shortage of celebrity pie to go round.

Dear Michael Jackson

So you've just released your first single for two years. It has lots of sirens and breaking glass in it. And as for the lyrics ... a former fan wonders what's going on in your head

GMTV wins reprieve after improvement in services: Better news coverage helps station described by watchdog as 'poor' escape fine. Rhys Williams reports

GMTV has avoided a possible pounds 2m fine and the shortening of its 10- year broadcasting licence after the Independent Television Commission found yesterday that it had made a 'demonstrable improvement' in its services.

Soothing start enlivened by Motivator

'TAKE THAT - are they too raunchy?' Apparently so for Graham and Susan Walker, who had treated their daughter Lucy to concert tickets for her eighth birthday. But so appalled were they by newspaper reports of the group's flirtation with erotica that they stopped her from going.

TELEVISION / Long Runners: No 35: Through the Keyhole

Age: seven. First broadcast 3 April 1987; recently celebrated its 100th episode with a Jane Asher cake in the shape of a house.

Putt it away: Leslie Neilsen brings you a new sport on video - spoof golf. Owen Slot talks bad backswings with the champion of 'dumb' humour

Last Tuesday, Leslie Nielsen sat on the GMTV couches, embarrassing Eamonn Holmes by making farting noises in front of the cameras. Nielsen was there to promote his new video, Bad Golf Made Easier, but the combination of the comic video clips, his hallmark straight-faced silliness and the schoolboy parping seemed to put his whole repartee up for scrutiny.

Media: Switching on, off and over

IN ITS first six months, GMTV lost pounds 268 every minute it was on the air. Advertisers wondered about a station whose younger viewers were fleeing in droves to Channel 4's The Big Breakfast. Whatever costs are cut, ITV's early- morning company cannot be healthy until audiences rise.

Media: Who do you want to wake up with?: Channel 4 feeds us snap, crackle and pop, while BBC1 sticks to news. How should GMTV compete? Martin Wroe on the battle for breakfast ratings

FORGET News at Ten. Forget BBC1's problems in recovering the mid-evening audience lost by Wogan and Eldorado. The fiercest battle for viewers this autumn will take place while a significant proportion of the nation is still in bed.
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

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It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
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King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

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Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

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Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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