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Compulsive, obsessive, repetitive

Artists have been driven to make painstaking sculptures out of sugar cubes, fish scales and other unusual materials for a new exhibition at Towner contemporary

Robert Mapplethorpe: Looking for the unexpected

Leather-clad men handcuffed and holding whips stare nonchalantly out of black and white photographs. Naked torsos, suggestively unbuttoned shirts and large guns are just some of the recurring and highly charged motifs which made photographer Robert Mapplethorpe notorious when Washington’s Corcoran Gallery of Art refused to display his work shortly after his death in 1989.

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Murray's fellow Britons let side down as they all crash out

Perhaps yesterday may turn out to be not just the nadir, but the turning point. Admittedly Anne Keothavong, in squandering a 4-0 lead in the deciding set against Anastasia Rodionova, seemed to reiterate a lack of fortitude and depth in British tennis.

Malcolm Vaughan: Singer who fell foul of the BBC but sold half a

In October 1956, Malcolm Vaughan was due to appear on BBC TV's Off The Record to promote his new release, "St. Therese Of The Roses". The invitation was withdrawn a few days later after a BBC committee had determined that the record was unsuitable for broadcast because "the lyric is contrary both to Roman Catholic doctrine and to Protestant sentiment." The resulting controversy helped to sell records, and with airplay on Radio Luxembourg the sugary wedding song climbed to No 3, stayed on the charts for five months and sold half a million copies.