Voices elephants in rain

Protecting habitat and engaging the local community are crucial for both rhinos and elephants, says Christian Lambrechts, the managing director of Rhino Ark

Fate of the rainforest is 'irreversible'

A third of the Amazonian 'carbon sink' is doomed whether or not emissions are cut, Copenhagen conference is told

Reptile loss threatens global biodiversity

More than a fifth of the world's reptiles are threatened with extinction, a new method of monitoring the fortunes of groups of species revealed today.

Ground-level ozone pollution to increase

Ground-level ozone pollution is contributing to hundreds of deaths a year in the UK - and climate change could help make the situation worse, a report from the Royal Society warned today.

Founding father of the internet opens new web foundation

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, a key figure in the formation of the World Wide Web, has announced the creation of a new group to advance a "free and open" internet.

Swamped by developers, but now there is hope for the Everglades

Return to the state of nature planned for Florida's unique 'River of Grass'

The Hacker: Fighting for scraps at the lower end of the food chain

My esteemed colleague Peter Corrigan has highlighted the furore that has developed since golf's governing body Congu decreed that matchplay competitions should be played off full handicap difference.

Simon Carr: No wonder we are in such a sorry state

Here's a brilliant example of the sort of society we live in. Perfect, in its way. It's so boring that we never willingly focus on it.

Revealed: polluting impact of humans on the oceans

Almost every part of the world's oceans has been tainted to some extent by the destructive footprint of human activity, whether it is from overfishing and pollution or commercial shipping and coastal development.

Urban gardener, Cleve West: Waste not, want not

"So how exactly do you go about using night soil at your allotment?" said Rick, a dour but thoughtful Yorkshireman who occasionally gets mistaken for the actor Sean Bean. A man of few words, his standard response ("everyone looks like Sean Bean up here") usually comes after a long, wistful pause. Gasping for breath, and looking down a steep slope to Red Tarn from Swirral Edge (near Ullswater) I told him I'd be in a better state to answer him properly when we got to the top of Helvellyn.

MBA finance modules: Should qualified accountants be exempt?

You are a qualified accountant with an ambition to become chief executive. To make the grade, you'll need to learn more about general business strategy but don't see the value of sitting in on finance classes that tell you what you already know. How will schools react to this?

Cooper Brown: He's Out There

'Our hosts were both very big in the City and were leading this hedonistic, extravagant lifestyle'

Coral reefs may start to dissolve in 30 years

SCIENTISTS ARE predicting that coral reefs could start to dissolve within 30 years as rising carbon dioxide levels make the seas more acidic.
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine