Voices Elephants at sunrise

A new Kenyan law aims to quell poaching by increasing the notoriously light penalties for the growing illegal trade

The incredible shrinking polar bear

Animals lose weight and size as melting ice limits hunting

Henry the tuatara is a dad at 111

A rare reptile has become a father at the age of 111 for the first time. Henry, a New Zealand tuatara, confounded experts who believed he was past it when he succumbed to the charms of Mildred last year.

Radio in 2008: Hello Bob, adieu Humph, good riddance George

This column's smash of 2007 was Bob Dylan's Theme Time Radio Hour. I'm afraid it's déjà vu all over again, to coin a phrase. The music, mostly drawn from the mid-century hinterland of American popular music, may be an acquired taste, but it's presented by the wisest man on radio. It's not too big a leap to imagine that, for many, Dylan's legacy will not be restricted to his own music.

Dein wants aid for referees

The former Arsenal vice-chairman David Dein insists there is too much at stake in football to hold back on the introduction of technology and has said that referees are a "endangered species". Costly and questionable refereeing decisions have prompted hot debate on the issue over recent years, most prominently on whether technology could be used to decide whether a ball has crossed the goal-line.

Michael McCarthy: I love the sound of squeaking bats...

Nature Notebook

Leading article: Live forever

It Is the thing every meglomaniac has dreamed of and every sane person has feared.

£5.5m to save England's most threatened species

Schemes to protect natterjack toads, fritillary butterflies and sharks are to receive funding as part of a £5.5 million programme to help some of England's most threatened wildlife, it was announced today.

Sir Bill Cotton, BBC's king of light entertainment, dies at the age of 80

Sir Bill Cotton, the former BBC executive who oversaw classic shows including Monty Python's Flying Circus, Morecambe And Wise and The Two Ronnies, has died aged 80.

First-time buyers 'becoming endangered species'

In a rare glimmer of good news for the housing market, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors said yesterday that it detected "tentative signs that housing activity may be nearing a floor", but also warned that the Government's "confused messages" on stamp duty "risks damaging any returning confidence and may discourage mobility".

Scotsman's sporran doomed by European ban on sealskins

The Highland kilt must rank as one of the most distinctive and manly items of clothing that the world has ever seen. But it has no pockets. Braveheart warrior types, though, were never going to resort to carrying some kind of proto man bag. So the sealskin sporran was born.

Picture Post: Brought to book - the wildlife smugglers

It's not only the drugs, money or jewels that customs officials have to look out for. Yesterday, some rather exotic stowaways were discovered at an Australian customs exports checkpoint. A batch of 15 leaf-tail geckos had been concealed within hollowed-out books and behind the canvas in some picture frames. Sent by post, the packages were bound for the Czech Republic. The tale does not have a happy ending, however: most of the reptiles had died through lack of air, food and water. "The general method seems to have been to send more than one gecko in each parcel and hope that at least one of them survived the journey," said Richard Janeczko, who managed the investigation.

An epidemic of extinctions: Decimation of life on earth

Species are dying out at a rate not seen since the demise of the dinosaurs, according to a report published today – and human behaviour is to blame. Emily Dugan counts the cost

US enacts law to protect polar bears, but only from hunting

The United States declared the polar bear a threatened species yesterday; saying the dramatic reduction in sea ice caused by global warming has put it in imminent danger of extinction.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine