News South Sudanese government soldiers wait to board trucks and pickups; a cessation of hostilities agreement in Addis Ababa that should at the least put a pause to five weeks of warfare has been reached

Government and rebel leaders in South Sudan have signed a ceasefire – the first step towards peace in the country after five weeks of violence in which more than 1,000 people have been killed and hundreds of thousands forced from their homes.

Ethiopia have eyes on place in World Cup 2014

The African nation are close to a place in the tournament in Brazil

Stuart Pearce in contemplative mood

Stuart Pearce’s final act is to give next batch of England Under-21 kids tournament experience against Israel

Coach of eliminated Under-21 side to play youngsters available for next tournament

An opposition march in Addis Ababa on Sunday called for the release of political prisoners

Voices in Danger: Jailed for 18 years for criticising Ethiopia's government, journalist Eskinder Nega vows to keep fighting

The Independent has seen a defiant letter smuggled out of jail by a man who pines for democracy

Ethiopia has begun diverting the flow of the River Nile as part of its controversial scheme to build Africa’s largest hydroelectric dam

Ethiopia diverts Nile to build mega-dam

Hydroelectric project creating water anxiety in Egypt; reporter covering farm evictions arrested

Mo Farah runs as he completes his half-marathon

Mo Farah patient over London Marathon success

Double Olympic champion fancies a crack at Steve Jones' 28-year-old British record of two hours seven minutes 13 seconds

James Ashton: Human capital could be Dubai’s next challenge

“Do you like cricket?” the Pakistani taxi driver asked as he drove us out to The Atlantis hotel, a pink confection on the tip of The Palm that features an ATM dispensing gold in a Rodeo Drive-style shopping arcade. “You look like a bowler.”

Refugee Boy, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds

Benjamin Zephaniah’s second novel Refugee Boy has played a powerful role in humanising the plight of the enforced migrant for a generation of young people. Published in 2001 following his encounter with a young Sri Lankan boy who had witnessed the murder of his parents in the country’s brutal civil war, the poet wrote the book hoping to convince his audience that refugees were not just statistics but real, brave, living-breathing people.

Mo Farah wins in New Orleans half-marathon

Britain's Mo Farah outsprinted Ethiopia's Gebre Gebremariam to win the New Orleans half-marathon yesterday.

Israel gave birth control to Ethiopian Jews without their consent

Israel has admitted for the first time that it has been giving Ethiopian Jewish immigrants birth-control injections, often without their knowledge or consent.

Fans cheer before the Africa Cup of Nations Zambia vs Ethiopia group C football match

African Cup of Nations: Happy return for Ethiopia

Ethiopia celebrated their return to the African Cup of Nations after a 33-year absence by holding defending champions Zambia to a 1-1 draw in Nelspruit.

Eritrean soldiers force media to call for release of political prisoners

Soldiers with tanks laid siege to the information ministry in the capital, Amara, and forced state media to call for political prisoners to be freed.

IoS paperback review: Disaster Was My God: The Life of Arthur Rimbaud, By Bruce Duffy

As a teenager, Arthur Rimbaud shocked 19th-century Paris with his experimental verse and taste for debauchery (he had an affair with the married poet Paul Verlaine, who later shot him in a fit of jealousy).

The Azores

Travel in 2013: Holidays for nature-lovers

The potential to see some of the brightest displays of aurora borealis in 50 years continues through the first few months of 2013.

Genocide in the past leaves Rwanda in need of funds now

Rwanda's dark past is no reason to withhold aid

A country trying to mend itself needs more, not less, help

The tree-climbing girl who turns the history of man on its head

The fragile remains of a three-year-old girl who died about 3.3 million years ago in East Africa have revealed that our early human ancestors still spent much of their time in the trees long after they had fully mastered the art of walking on two legs.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before