News Prices for single-family homes rose in 81 percent in America

Prices for single-family homes rose in 81 percent of the nation's cities as the property market extends a recovery from the worst crash since the 1930s.

US lenders fear worst after two more fail

American bank executives are braced for another volatile and dangerous week after the collapse over the weekend of two more regional lenders.

Republicans back away from blocking Fannie rescue plan

Hank Paulson, the US Treasury secretary, appeared to have won his battle of wills with Congress yesterday over plans to bail out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the mortgage finance giants whose feared collapse threatened to cripple the US economy.

Stephen King: Public funds needed to resolve financial crisis – and taxpayer will pick up the bill

One swallow doth not a summer make. Two summers of financial crisis, though, are enough to make the most robust of policymakers swallow hard. Last year, the spike in money market rates, the banks' loss of confidence in one another, the collapse of securitisation and, eventually, the nasty accident now known as Northern Rock were, collectively, fairly indigestible. Many investors hoped, though, that policymakers had enough firepower to deal with these problems. Interest rate cuts, they opined, would be enough to do the trick.

They gave ordinary Americans a home. And then the roof fell in

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac set out as 'white knight' lenders bringing mortgages to the less-well-off. But an ideal born in the depression, says Philip Blond, could cause another one

Margereta Pagano: Hank the Hammer - the superhero who saved the US from meltdown

It's Paulson to the rescue again, averting the Freddie and Fannie crisis

Do we build them up or knock them down?

Step one: avoid a run on the bank. Check. Step two: recapitalise. Er, we'll get back to you. Step three: stop this from ever happening again. Um ...

Citigroup's loss of 'only' $7.2bn cheers markets

Citigroup, one of the banking giants hardest hit by the credit crisis, said it suffered another $7.2bn (£3.6bn) in losses on its mortgage portfolio in the past three months, but such is the misery to have engulfed the industry that this figure was actually a piece of good news.

Markets tumble as inflation hits 3.8%

The stock market tumbled to its lowest level since 2005 yesterday as grim news on inflation and the worsening financial crisis in the United States hit shares.

Jeremy Warner's Outlook: Freddie and Fannie not yet out of the woods

American legislators had been hoping that Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae would be part of the solution to the beleaguered US mortgage market. Only a little while back, the strict rules governing what type of mortgages Freddie and Fannie were allowed to securitise were relaxed a little in an effort to re-start the US housing market. Yet now they have become very much a part of the problem. Is there no end to the extraordinary loss of confidence that has engulfed financial markets over the past year?

Leading article: The full extent of the crisis is only just emerging

Yesterday's figures for manufacturing inflation, showing a 10 per cent rise on the year, together with Sunday's rescue package for the stricken Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgage concerns, can only make the policy dilemmas facing the Government ever more excruciating. The trouble is that the two developments face in diametrically opposite directions.

To the rescue of Fannie & Freddie

Shares of many US regional banks plunged again yesterday, despite Henry Paulson's promised bail-out of America'stwin mortgage giants. By Stephen Foley

Market Report: Broker re-evaluation makes ITV one to watch

Positive broker comment and a measure of bid speculation propelled ITV to pole position on the FTSE 100 yesterday.

US Treasury credit deal to shore up Freddie and Fannie

The United States Treasury and The Federal Reserve announced measures to shore up Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac – the struggling government-sponsored companies that underpin the American mortgage market – in a bid to head off a potential meltdown in global financial markets.

World markets braced for more falls after US mortgage collapse

American troubles further destabilise London shares, with fears that the news is only going to get worse over the coming weeks

World's largest mortgage providers teeter on the brink of collapse

America's regulators were last night shoring up the country's financial defences, after one of the biggest bank failures in US history sparked fears about the viability of the world's largest mortgage providers.

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