Voices

It must be incalculably bizarre to have two such men as possible fathers

Words: intern, n.

WHEN ASKED for Frank Sinatra, a greasy-faced HMV assistant grunted "under F in Rock & Pop" rather than S and Easy Listening (some Sinatra is desolate). Remonstration to the manager revealed that this churl "is on a work-experience week, we usually keep him out of sight in the basement".

Acting, and the art of reading between the lies

It seemed fitting that in the very week when a commercially-minded television mogul pleaded at the Edinburgh Festival for less regulation of independent television companies, a fresh wave of controversy should have broken out over a so-called "documentary". This one concerned the father-and-daughter team which was to have been the subject of an intimate family portrait on Channel 4. It was called Daddy's Girl, and featured the relationship between a youngish father and his daughter, a would-be model. At the eleventh hour, it hit a reef when the girl's real father phoned Channel 4 to point out that the "father" in their film was in fact his daughter's boyfriend: the television company had been taken for a painful ride.

Obituary: Eva Bartok

ALTHOUGH PUBLICISED in the Fifties as Britain's answer to Sophia Loren, the actress Eva Bartok became better known for her tempestuous private life than for her appearances in a string of generally mediocre films. By the time she was 30, she had been married and divorced four times, one of her husbands being actor Curt Jurgens, while her lovers included the Marquess of Milford Haven and Frank Sinatra. Her most notable films are two cult movies, the pastiche swashbuckler The Crimson Pirate, in which she starred opposite Burt Lancaster, and Mario Bava's horror film Blood and Black Lace.

Football: World Cup - Defeat is not so bad, it's hope that is intolerable

ANDY MARTIN At Large In France - Lens

The man with the golden pen

CINEMA: Saul Bass turned the humble movie credit sequence into an art form. David Thomson celebrates the work of a master miniaturist

Thoughts that go bump in the night

WOKE UP the other morning, suddenly, at 4.30, absolutely frantic with worry about the Universe. You know the sort of thing, bottom sheet rucked up, inexplicable sand in the bed, tubercular glow of the street- lamps, cold sweat, palpitations.

Music: Begin the Beguine again

As the dazzling sophistication of Cole Porter comes to London, David Benedict speaks to the conductor, John McGlynn, below, while opposite, Edward Seckerson meets the singer McGlynn will be conducting at the Palace Theatre on Sunday night, Kim Criswell

Sinatra has it his way from beyond the grave

FRANK SINATRA'S will ensures that the battle for his inheritance will be bitterly fought for a long time, but the battle will be conducted in secret.

Sinatra's will made public

FRANK SINATRA'S wife of 22 years and his three children were left most of his assets in a will filed the day after the entertainer's funeral. Sinatra also warned that anyone who contested his wishes would be disinherited. Barbara Sinatra was left most of his real estate holdings, as well as rights to market his name and likeness.

Sinatra's bequests

FRANK SINATRA has left multi-million dollar estates to his fourth wife and widow, Barbara, and "very substantial assets" to his three children.

One melancholy ballad, and the whole of his art

IN concert Frank Sinatra used to introduce "One For My Baby", the most celebrated saloon ballad in his repertoire, with an extended passage of spoken scene-setting. Over the years his description of the lonely loser at the bar became exaggeratedly flip and hip ("his chick flew the coop ... took all the bread"), but when, finally, he broke into song ("It's quarter to three, there's no one in the place") he was instantly another man.

We hear a lot about cool: this was where it began

As a singer, Frank Sinatra set the standard by which all others are judged. The same was true of his style

Obituary: Frank Sinatra

"WE ALL grew up with Sinatra," said the film director Peter Bogdanovich. "His songs have meant so much to us that, when he sings, he's not only doing his own autobiography, he's doing ours." "The Voice", "Ol' Blue Eyes", "The Chairman of the Board", "King of the Hill" - Frank Sinatra was a phenomenon, a pint-sized colossus bestriding the worlds of film, finance and music.

Frank Sinatra: The one man in America who; could do whatever he wanted

`He seemed now to be the embodiment of the fully emancipated male, perhaps the only one in America.' That was how the American-Italian writer Gay Talese (left) described Frank Sinatra at 50. The year was 1965, Beatlemania was at its height, but Sinatra, product of everything that was pre-Sixties, was at the height of his powers; he was worshipped and he was feared. In this piece, first published in the American edition of `Esquire', Talese captures him with a vividness and knowingness that has rarely been equalled

Frank Sinatra: It didn't mean a thing unless Ol' Blue Eyes made it swing

Once criticised for singing songs as if he believed them, that was precisely what made him the best.
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