Graffiti

Vengeful settler attacks draw sharp criticism of Israeli Army

An Israeli human rights group has charged that the army is failing to protect Palestinians from violence by settlers after masked Israelis attacked an elementary school, vandalised cars and torched hundreds of olive trees in the occupied West Bank.

Film review: Foxfire - It's the Fifties, but the chrome can't compete

Here's a Riot Grrl story if ever there was one: a bunch of rebellious young women form a gang, smite their male oppressors and generally paint small-town America red. It could be the premise for something pulpy and brash, and according to reviews, that's what the 1996 adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates's novel Foxfire was, with its showcase lead for an up-and-coming Angelina Jolie. I haven't seen that film, and I suspect you haven't either, so let's agree that the new screen version of the book starts with a clean slate.

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Divisions – and defiance – take hold in former Egyptian President

A group of village children scampered behind the coffin as it was driven past some mud-brick stables. Inside was the body of Dr Sayeed Abdel Salaam. Until last week he had been a 42-year-old government vet; a father-of-three who gave away much of his money to help local orphans, according to friends. Today he became a statistic – a battered and bloodied victim of the 30 June insurrection.

Jay-Z, Magna Carta Holy Grail - review

In this age of the spectacle, music increasingly matters less than the event surrounding the music - this year has seen Daft Punk's album applauded as much for its marketing campaign as for any intrinsic musical value it may have, and now we have Jay-Z's new album, notable largely for the deal struck with Samsung to deliver a million free downloads to its customers, at a cost of $5 apiece to the company, three days prior to its official release.