Sport Shining example: Dan Carter sports the cap he received for making his 100th Test appearance

His eye an egg, Chris Robshaw convinced as the vanquished captain, but looking around the pitch at the close, having briefly led the best team in the world, there was vindication as well as the scars.

Sport on TV: Nightmare images of the pyjama game

IN THE week a new England football manager was finally appointed, the former incumbent appeared on national television in his pyjamas. There were many scenes in 'An Impossible Job' which might have served as chilling premonitions for Terry Venables, but none more so than the one shot early in the morning in Graham Taylor's Dutch hotel room. This, Mr Venables, is the way it goes, for England managers. You start out in your overcoat at a press reception on the Wembley pitch, waving warmly to the cameras of The Nine O'Clock News. But you end up clad in a set of British Home Stores' nylon best, cleaning your teeth in a Channel 4 documentary.

Caught doing the business in a motorway service area

JUST how does the Football Association go about finding a new manager for the England team? Well, like most of the best things in the tradition of football, the business tends to takes place very informally . . .

The dark side of television

EVEN the most forbearing of critics can be goaded into protest by television's incessant reiteration of the gospel that sport should be laid bare.

Football: Venables not keen on FA's quibbles

TERRY VENABLES spent last night considering not the small print but the large cost of a contract which could see him out of pocket if he takes on the management of England.

REVIEW / Much more serious than life and death

THERE was a rather touching moment in Cutting Edge's much previewed documentary about Graham Taylor (C4), in which the England manager travels to Spain to tell David Platt he's no longer captain. You don't actually see how he does it (the degree of access the film crew were given has been slightly exaggerated) but he's decent and consoling in the immediate aftermath. Pointing across a dusty square at three fat little boys with a beach-ball, Taylor suggests that they 'could go and have a game with those kids now'. He badly needs a win at this stage of the film and, despite being one man down, it looks doable. Platt considers it for a moment, but obviously decides it's too risky under the current management.

MPs often obscene, but seldom heard

THIS WEEK a television documentary on the former England football manager, Graham Taylor, will show him using the F-word 36 times. A nation which is just coming to terms with press disclosure of the Prime Minister's private language - 'bastards' and the so far unsubstantiated 'f***ing' - will wonder once again about the discrepancy between public and private behaviour, even among the most bloodless of our leading figures.

It's dirty work but someone's got to do it: England football managers come and England football managers go (thank goodness) with the curses of the press in their ears. But if Graham Taylor's teams had scored as much as he swore, everyone would have been much kinder. Jim White reports

'There has been some controversy about the language in this film,' said Neil Duncanson, producer of Graham Taylor: The Impossible Job, a documentary to be screened on Channel 4 on Monday night. 'For the record, Mr Taylor utters 38 fucks, three craps, two shits and there is an obscured wanker.'

Football: Men who kept the press in its place: Graham Taylor's reign was indicative of a growing tension between managers and the media. Ken Jones looks back and examines how some of the great names from the past handled the Fourth Estate

THE sight last week of Stan Cullis leading out players from the history of Wolverhampton Wanderers prompted some grizzled veterans to wonder if he could have handled the modern pressures of football management.

England's most wanted man: 'What we are looking for is a leader capable of slamming the dressing room door in the faces of his critics': Eamon Dunphy calls for a manager who truly understands the character of his country

FEW will lament Graham Taylor's passing. On the contrary, as an opinion poll conducted last year showed, this England manager was one of the least popular public figures in the country. Purporting to be a leader, Taylor was too eager to please, irritatingly desperate to explain himself with an eye, always, on self-justification. Yet, sadly, he was not the master of post-rationalisation designed to deflect the buck which was inevitably heading in his direction.

Football: Is this man to blame for England's failure?: He helped appoint Graham Taylor. Now that Taylor's gone, isn't it time he did the same? Joe Lovejoy talked to Peter Swales, chairman of the FA's international committee, and asked him what he planned to do next

THE KING is dead, enter the kingmaker. The scene is not the palatial portals of Lancaster Gate but a poky little hi-fi shop in the back streets of Altrincham, from where the search for Graham Taylor's successor is being run.

Oh, for Graham Taylor

To Chipping Norton, in the Cotswolds, to visit John Minihan, the world's most accomplished portrait photographer. I introduced him to Sam Beckett with strict instructions to discuss no topic but cricket or gossip. The consequence was a series of portraits that has toured the world.

Football: FA to keep up pursuit of Howe

DON HOWE is to be offered the post of England caretaker- manager, following Graham Taylor's resignation, despite stating categoricaly he is not interested in the job in any shape or form, writes Clive White.

Sports Letter: Screened candidate

Sir: If we are to learn from the mistake of appointing Graham Taylor, the next England manager must be:

Sports Letter: Time for act of faith

Sir: The next England manager needs to have the maturity of Ron Greenwood, but not have the personal life of Bobby Robson or the fallibility of judgement of Graham Taylor. He (or she) must be fit, have the experience of running a large organisation with the respect of the supporters.

Sports Letter: My mate's the man

Sir: I would like to nominate a colleague, Martin Bowdery, for the post of England manager. His experience is as follows: coach and manager of Muswell Hill under-10s; winner of the Fair Play award in the Enfield District League.
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