Welcome to the new Independent website. We hope you enjoy it and we value your feedback. Please contact us here.


The big thaw: Greenland ice cover is melting away

The vast ice sheet of Greenland, which holds enough water to raise global sea levels by 7.2 metres, underwent a remarkable transformation for a few days this month when scientists observed an unprecedented melting of its frozen surface.

Billions of tons of water lost from world's glaciers, satellite

The total volume of water that has melted from all of the world's polar ice sheets, ice caps and mountain glaciers over the past decade would repeatedly fill Britain's largest lake, Windemere, more than 13,000 times, according to one of the most comprehensive studies of the Earth's frozen "cryosphere".

Greenland, National Theatre: Lyttelton, London

Enter pursued by a (polar) bear. There's a wonderful moment in Greenland where this white ursine creature lopes in, to the consternation not just of the geographers on the Arctic island where, because of global warming, the Inuits are having to invent a noun for "robin", but of the policy wonks with their laptops who are preparing for a global summit on this issue. The piece goes in for that kind of conceptual compositeness. The creature noses around and then exits pursued by no one.

The UK may be cold, but it's still a warm world, says Met Office chief

She may have been one of the many thousands of people who failed to get to work yesterday because of the snow, but Professor Julia Slingo, the Met Office's chief scientist, is adamant that the current cold weather is merely a natural fluctuation – and does not mean that global warming is all a myth.

Andy Kershaw returns to Radio 3

Broadcaster Andy Kershaw is to return to BBC Radio 3 after three years off-air as a result of personal problems, it was announced today.

More headlines

Revealed: the face of Greenland (circa 2000BC)

He had brown eyes, non-white skin, "shovel-shaped" front teeth and was at high risk of going bald and suffering ear infections. Oh, and he lived 4,000 years ago and nothing remains except a clump of his thick, dark hair.