Arts and Entertainment

"It is my experience of the countryside that I am trying to convey to the public"

Greenland gold mine sells for a tiny fraction of last year's $30m asking price

Angus & Ross, the Aim-listed natural resources company, has bought a gold mine for just 5 per cent of its asking price last year.

Microbes found miles beneath Greenland ice given new life

Discovery raises hopes of lifeforms enduring harsh conditions on other planets

What on Earth Happened?, By Christopher Lloyd

This snappy history of our planet tells you something new on virtually every page. On page 70, we learn that our forebears' descent from the trees and the brain development required to utilise their free hands explains the difference between us and the genetically all-but-identical chimpanzees.

Melting ice could cause gravity shift

Northern hemisphere sea levels 'will rise the most' if Antarctic sheet disintegrates

Macau: A mix of Cantonese culture and Portuguese heritage, all played out against a Las Vegas backdrop

It's a rough ride on the flimsy jetfoil which runs between Hong Kong to the tiny peninsula of Macau. And I wonder whether I'm still feeling the effects of the crossing when I clap eyes on a 40-metre high plastic volcano complete with pyrotechnic eruptions. It's flanked by an ersatz Venice Duomo, a concrete Colosseum and a replica Portuguese plaza. This is Fisherman's Wharf, the theme park which opened in 2005 to welcome new arrivals from the ferry terminal. It was seen as a way for the Chinese to put their stamp on Macau – the first European colony in China to be founded. In 1999 it was the last to be given up when it was wrested away from Portuguese administration after 450 years of foreign rule. However, Fisherman's Wharf in Macau is no match for its namesake in San Francisco. The venture isn't an aesthetic success: visitors now have to head a little further inland to see the bricks and mortar of the city's Portuguese heritage.

Ready to Wear: Peter Jensen has become the object of a surprising, and rather unusual protest

Peter Jensen is probably the last designer on earth one would expect to trigger protests. It would be like campaigning against fluffy kittens or baby rabbits... Stop the bunnies, they are too cute! Never going to happen. However, the Danish designer who is known for taking such endearingly quirky themes for his shows as the 1970s camping film Nuts In May, and classic Jodie Foster films, has become the object of a surprising, and rather unusual protest.

Predators will get room to roam in their fight for life

An international action plan is to be drawn up to save the polar bear, now threatened with extinction because climate change is melting its Arctic sea ice habitat.

Bag a polar bear for $35,000: the new threat to the species

The latest challenge for fans of extreme hunting is an expedition to the Arctic Circle. Jerome Taylor reports

Hunters under fire in battle to save polar bear from extinction

Summit to discuss limits on hunting as starvation hits numbers of Arctic predators

Ready to Wear: Can thigh-high boots ever be right on?

And so to the accessory of the autumn/winter season, which may have been a restrained if lovely affair, at least in some designers' hands, but more than made up for any conservatism in dress as far as footwear is concerned. Enter the thigh-high boot.

Ready to Wear: Unlike with Woody Allen, Peter Jensen’s muses are far from predictable

Playing the muse, we all know, is a risky business. Just look at how quickly Woody Allen cast aside Scarlett Johansson in favour of the bright and beautiful young actress du jour, Freida Pinto, for example. Ms Pinto will be playing the ingénue in the director's new film, by all accounts. Poor Scarlett! Nowhere is any fickleness more marked than in the world of designer fashion, however – well, it's known for that, isn't it?

London Fashion Week - Peter Jensen

After an inspiring trip to Greenland, Peter Jensen found this season's quirky new muse, Aunt Jytte - a chip shop owner from Nuuk. Floral topped boots, padded jackets and hand-knitted bobble hats made for an altogether eclectic collection.

War against ivory trade takes to the sea

Auction house agrees to stop sale of whale tusks after pressure from campaigners

Two Planks and a Passion, By Roland Huntford

Skiing and surprises from the Arctic to the Alps

Dom Joly: Spouse schlepping, glacial golf or hubcap hurlin' – you choose

Weird World of Sport: The slogan of the Redneck Games is 'everyone and their butt crack is welcome
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us