News Prisoners being held at Guantanamo Bay. The majority of inmates are being held without charge

The announcement comes as two Algerian men held at the camp for a decade are released without charge in a revived push towards gradual closure

WikiLeaks: Terror suspect 'was British agent'

An al-Qa'ida operative accused of bombing Christian churches and a luxury hotel in Pakistan in 2002 was working for British intelligence at the same time, according to leaked files.

US scrambles to contain fallout from 'damaging' Guantanamo leak

President again under pressure to make good on promise to close camp

Wikileaks: Leak reveals new Guantanamo secrets

Secret documents about detainees at the Guantanamo Bay prison reveal new information about some of the men that the United States believes to be terrorists.

Clive Stafford Smith: This plan just perpetuates the prisoners' legal limbo

In November 2003 Lord Steyn launched a scathing attack on the "justice" being meted out to prisoners in Guantanamo Bay. He tarred the military commission process as a "kangaroo court". How could a tribunal that applied retrospective laws, with a hand-picked military judge presiding over a hand-picked military jury, admitting coerced evidence, with no appeal to the federal courts, possibly satisfy the right to due process, fundamental to any country that would call itself civilised?

Ex-Guantanamo prisoner gets life in civilian trial

The first former Guantanamo Bay detainee to face civilian trial in the US was refused leniency yesterday, instead receiving a life jail sentence and a symbolic multi-million dollar fine for bombing US embassies in East Africa.

Labour put limits on Iraq Inquiry to keep the US happy

Gordon Brown's Government secretly promised to limit the extent of the Iraq war inquiry to prevent damage to the United States, the leaked cables disclosed. The pledge – made last September as the Chilcot inquiry into the war started – threatens to damage the credibility of the investigation, which is due to report in the new year.

Torture settlement brings hope to last British inmate in Guantanamo

Britain presses US to free Shaker Aamer after almost nine years in detention

'Sophisticated justice' in Guantanamo trial

The first civilian trial in America of a Guantanamo Bay detainee showed a "sophisticated justice system" at work, the UK Government's independent terror legislation watchdog said today.

'Insufficient evidence' against MI5 officer over torture claims

An MI5 officer will not be prosecuted over claims he was complicit in the torture of former Guantanamo Bay detainee Binyam Mohamed.

Bill for settling Guantanamo Bay 'torture' cases could top £30m

Compensation payments and legal costs for 16 British citizens and residents who claim they were tortured at Guantanamo Bay could leave the Government footing a bill of up to £30m.

Government confirms payout to ex-Guantanamo detainees

The Government will make payments to former detainees held at Guantanamo Bay to settle High Court actions and help pave the way for an inquiry into allegations of British complicity in torture, the Justice Secretary said today.

Guantanamo inmates set to receive payouts of up to £1m

British former inmates of Guantanamo Bay are to set to receive large payments from the Government to drop claims that British secret agents knew they were being tortured.

Blair knew of Guantanamo torture in 2002, lawyers claim

Tony Blair was alerted to allegations of torture involving UK nationals held in Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay within months of the "War on Terror" beginning, lawyers claimed yesterday.

Victims of extraordinary rendition cannot sue, US court rules

Legal action by terror suspects sent by the CIA to foreign countries for torture blocked on national security grounds

Lidless, Underbelly

An uncomfortable watch in more ways than one, for Lidless the audience is lined up on tiny camping stools around the walls of a brightly-lit white box. Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig's punchy play won the Yale Drama Series Award in 2009 and plaudits from David Hare and it's easy to see why. The meeting between a Guantanamo Bay interrogator, Alice, who can't remember what she did there and one of her inmates, Bashir, who can't forget it, is fraught with tension and indignation.

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