Arts and Entertainment

The great thing about "counterfactual" history is that anyone can play. If Gordon Brown hadn't been caught making those remarks about a "bigoted woman" might he still be PM? If Hitler had invaded England in 1940 would we all be speaking German? If the judge in the Rivonia trial had sentenced Nelson Mandela to death rather than life in jail?

Cirque Mandingue / The Great Spalvados, Roundhouse, London (3/5, 4/5)

Cirque Mandingue, who open the Roundhouse’s Circusfest season, have strong and exuberant acrobats, slightly hampered by a clichéd sense of theatre. The core team do pyramid balancing, tumbling and stomping dance moves. The energy dips when they start clowning or telling stories.

Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, disappeared with her navigator over the Pacific in 1937

New clue sparks bid to solve mystery of missing aviator Amelia Earhart

Hillary Clinton launches search after photograph appears to show fate of US pioneer's aeroplane

Last Night's Viewing: Make Bradford British, Channel 4<br />Our Man in Ibiza, Channel 4

If Rashid isn't British, I'm not sure that anyone qualifies. A big, genial ex-rugby league player, he calls an alleyway a "snicket" and says "job's a good'un" when something's gone well. He's about as Bradford as they come – the only awkward detail being that you now have to specify which district of Bradford you're talking about. Channel 4 had chosen one of Britain's most segregated cities for its experiment in multicultural understanding – Make Bradford British – and what it hoped to work out was what common values might unite a citizenry so sharply divided by race and class. It was Big Brother with a social mission – eight pointedly different people invited to share a house and settle their differences, amicably if possible, though obviously a little friction wasn't going to go amiss.

James Ward shows off his stationery collection at his home

The Write Stuff: Britain's stationery fetish

From a £400 Alice Temperley Filofax to a gold-nibbed Montblanc pen, Britain's stationery fetish is refusing to be erased by technology

Last Night's Viewing: Daddy Daycare, Channel 4<br />Versailles, BBC2

"I get the feeling sometimes that the staff want us to fail," said Stefan, one of three men who featured in Daddy Daycare, a Channel 4 reality series designed to address a social crisis that almost certainly doesn't exist. I don't mean for a moment, by the way, that there are no incompetent or deadbeat fathers out there. Or that it isn't useful for even the most well-intentioned man to learn some lessons about childcare. But the implication that today's men are unusually bad at fatherhood ("Modern British life has spawned a generation of dysfunctional dads") is surely not true. Even the horror statistic used to underwrite this exercise in mental re-education could be seen from another angle as a silver lining: "Almost half of all mothers feel fathers don't do their share," said the voiceover at the beginning of the show. Really? You mean that as many as 50 per cent of mothers now feel fathers do? The truth of it was that it wasn't the staff at the south London nursery Stefan had been sent to who wanted him to fail. It was the production company. And even they only wanted him to fail a bit comically in the first half so that he could recover in the second, make a public act of contrition, and score a modest triumph before the final credits.

Hundreds saved from rough seas as ferry sinks in Papua New Guinea

Rescuers plucked more than 230 survivors from the sea after a ferry sank yesterday with up to 350 people on board.

Papua New Guinea rejects mutineers' demand

Prime Minister Peter O'Neill refused to step down despite a mutiny Thursday by soldiers who seized Papua New Guinea's military headquarters and demanded that he cede power to his ousted predecessor.

The Netherlands: No inquiry for cannibal stunt

Dutch prosecutors say they are not investigating a case of apparent cannibalism on a TV show in which presenters seemed to eat tiny pieces of each others' flesh.

Prosecutors will not investigate Dutch TV cannibalism

Dutch prosecutors are not investigating a case of apparent cannibalism on a Dutch TV show in which presenters appeared to consume tiny pieces of each others' flesh that had been surgically removed.

The presenters dressed in suits and sat on a candlelit set for the human meal

Come dine on me: Dutch TV hosts 'eat each other'

Two Dutch TV presenters will claim to be making broadcasting history tonight when millions of viewers tune in to watch them eating flesh surgically removed from each other's bodies in an unprecedented act of prime-time cannibalism.

Ethnic violence in Papua New Guinea leaves nine dead

Nine people have been killed and hundreds of properties destroyed in three days of ethnic clashes in Lae, the second biggest city in Papua New Guinea (PNG), the volatile Pacific nation which is home to more than 1,000 ethnic groups.

Kant&#233; Manfila: Pioneering guitarist with the Malian band Les Ambassadeurs

A greatly respected but underrated artist, Kanté Manfila was best known as the leader of Les Ambassadeurs, one of the most popular Malian bands of the 1970s and early 80s.

Guinean President survives attempt on his life

Guinea's democratically elected President survived an assassination attempt early yesterday when gunmen descended on his home, an attack that throws into doubt the political stability of this country with a history of coups and military rule.

Feast day: Mark Hix cooks an Easter meal with a difference

If you haven't worked out what you're having tomorrow, here's a slightly different Easter feast.

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A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

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The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

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20 best days out for the summer holidays

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