News The Teknik Perdana was looking for oil off the coast of Guyana

Two Britons are believed to be among the crew of a seismic research vessel under effective “ship arrest” today after becoming snarled in a territorial dispute that flared over the weekend between Venezuela and neighbouring Guyana, which dates back over a 100 years to when Guyana was under British control.

Two men convicted in JFK bomb plot

Two Islamist militants were found guilty yesterday by a federal jury of plotting to bomb John F Kennedy International Airport. Russell Defreitas, 67, a US citizen born in Guyana, and Abdul Kadir, 58, of Guyana, conspired to blow up buildings, fuel tanks and pipelines at the airport in the New York City borough of Queens.

The Week in Books: Salute the dark knight of Guyana

Writers, even the most conformist and conventional of them, very seldom receive knighthoods. Adventurous, uncompromising and idiosyncratic novelists almost never do. Yet, last week, in the Birthday Honours List, the Queen rewarded just such a figure. Raised in Guyana, by training a surveyor with a profound, life-changing knowledge of the fragile eco-systems of his native land. he has long lived in Essex. Half a century ago, TS Eliot (in his role as editor at Faber & Faber) talent-spotted his first novel.

Morgan's sleight of hand offers the promise of a dazzling future

All the talk now is of Eoin Morgan. It began as an excited muttering in South Africa last September, grew into something more voluble on his return there in November, became more urgent in Bangladesh in March and has shown no sign of declining from fever pitch in Guyana this week.

Free spirit: A trip to Guyana inspired Mark Hix's sensational rum-based menu

This week I'm writing about a recent break that I took to a wonderful rum distillery in Guyana. What with my tequila mission to Mexico last year, as well as quite a few wine trips abroad, it's true that many of my excursions are based around alcohol, but I justify them by telling myself that having a full understanding of all the types of alcohol in the world is an integral part of my job – at least that's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

Cy Grant: Pioneer for black British actors

Cy Grant has died after a brief illness at the age of 90. He was the first black person to appear regularly on British factual television.

Inside Travel: Journey Latin America - still pioneering after all these years

Thirty years ago, Chris Parrott co-founded the travel specialist Journey Latin America. At the time, the region was in turmoil, from Mexico and Guatemala to Argentina and Chile. Today Latin America is largely calm, peaceful and accessible (except, temporarily, Machu Picchu in Peru). But there is still plenty of virgin territory. In September, Chris will lead a prospecting trip to the territory that Evelyn Waugh described as "gobs of Empire": the Guianas. He tells Simon Calder about the trip.

Travel Agenda: Travel Live; American Airlines; Journey Latin America

Today: Adventure Travel Live at the Royal Horticultural Halls in central London features talks on the Inca Trail, going overland from Beijing to Cape Town, and Galápagos. The event continues tomorrow ( adventuretravelshow.co.uk ). Also today, the striking Oscar Niemeyer Auditorium will open with three days of cultural celebration in Ravello on Italy's Amalfi Coast ( auditoriumoscarniemeyer.it ).

Norway and Guyana sign rainforest deal

Report in <i>The Independent</i> key to $250m investment, says Guyana President

White too good for off-colour England

England 228-9 Australia 230-4 (Australia win by six wickets): Australian batsman only player to master conditions as home side suffer again

One Minute With: Pauline Melville

Janet Jagan: Marxist from Chicago who served as president of Guyana

Janet Jagan was white, Jewish and from Chicago, but for two years she served as President of Guyana, a Caribbean country on the mainland of South America deeply divided between communities of Indian and African origin. She was training as a nurse in her home town when she met Cheddi Jagan, a dental student whose parents had been brought from India as indentured labourers to work on a sugar plantation in what was then British Guiana, and the future course of her life was set.

On the Front Foot: Aussies in the shires? Now is the Billy Midwinter of our discontent

There have always been Australians in county cricket. They have frequently, like Stuart Clark last week, prompted a fuss. Take Billy Midwinter. WG Grace did. Born in England, Midwinter emigrated to Australia (like Darren Pattinson of more recent vintage, but that is another can of worms). He played for Australia in the first Test match of all in 1877 and became the first bowler to take five wickets in a Test innings in the Aussies' 45-run victory. Later that year, missing Gloucestershire where he was born, he became the county's first professional. But the following summer Australia were touring and Midwinter, offered oodles of cash, agreed to play for them. As they prepared to take on Middlesex at Lord's, WG Grace, the captain of Gloucestershire, stormed the dressing room and kidnapped Midwinter to play in the county's match at The Oval. He stayed awhile and toured Australia with England in 1881-82, playing four Tests. But he changed allegiance again and played another six Tests for Australia. From the 1950s on, there has been a steady flow of Australians in county cricket – the spinners Bruce Dooland and George Tribe among the first, miffed at being overlooked by the Test selectors – and recently it has turned into a flood. Thanks to the polarising acquiescence of counties, five of Australia's team in the Third Test against South Africa have played county cricket, many for several clubs. Clark has played for two counties already. Middlesex will be Phillip Hughes's first, but probably not his last. Loyalty is of no consideration, they are merely professionals being professional. They should all be welcomed as guests, but to suggest they do not hinder the development of English cricketers is folly. Perhaps they should be kidnapped.

Dom Joly: A fortnight in Chernobyl is my idea of a holiday

I've been looking back at my life, this past week. I'm not in therapy or anything, although hints to this effect are constantly being sprinkled all about me by the people who know me best.

Pietersen hails IPL as 'new level'

Former captain says England must learn from India's dynamic one-day batting

Tony Cozier: Guyana's great talent finally runs out of bad luck

Sarwan must at times have wondered why fate had dealt him such a tough hand
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In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible