'Baby Doc' charged with corruption on return to Haiti

Two days after returning to an astonished Haiti after almost 25 years of exile in France, former dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier was charged with corruption, theft, misappropriation of funds and various other crimes last night, in relation to allegations of mass brutality and unfettered corruption during his 15 years of rule.

Duvalier's return 'increases chances of arrest'

The return of exiled dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier to Haiti increases the chance of him being charged with atrocities during his rule, UN human rights officials said today.

Leading article: A broken nation's toxic import

The last thing Haiti needs right now is the return of Baby Doc, the former dictator whose rule in the Seventies and Eighties is remembered for its corruption and the brutality of his private militia, the Tonton Macouts. The people of the island, and the foreign diplomatic community, have been stunned by the unexpected return of the former playboy-despot Jean-Claude Duvalier to his Caribbean homeland for the first time since he was deposed in a coup in 1986.

Haiti's 'Baby Doc' in surprise return from exile

Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier, a once feared and reviled dictator who was ousted in a popular uprising nearly 25 years ago, made a surprise return to Haiti as the country wrestles with a political crisis, cholera outbreak and the stalled reconstruction from last year's devastating earthquake.

<i>IoS</i> letters, emails &amp; online postings (16 January 2011)

Nina Lakhani described the suffering of the Haitian people as a "festering global scandal" ("Haiti: One year on", 9 January). We in Haiti have been festering for years but no one, until now, has heeded our cries. As a Haitian and an aid worker, I know there is so much more that needs to be done to alleviate the frustrations of survivors still living in tents. But we must not lose sight of the real crisis in Haiti: not the movement of the earth that exposed the country's deep-rooted problems of unequal land distribution, an unregulated land tenure system, non-existent governance and continued violation of basic human rights.

One year after the earthquake, Haitians need real self-determination

On Tuesday 12th January 2010, an earthquake of epic proportions hit the Caribbean island of Haiti. Despite international outcry and millions of pounds being poured into the country, we are now one year on, and over a million people are living in tents.

Monitor calls for official candidate to be barred from Haiti election

An investigation into the elections in Haiti, which were mired in corruption and violence, is said to have concluded that the government's candidate failed to qualify for the second round run-off for the presidency.

Haiti: One year on, the scars of the earthquake have scarcely begun to heal

The fires are no longer burning, but precious little else has changed. These pictures, some taken this month, and others almost a year ago, lay bare just how slowly Haiti is recovering from the worst natural disaster in modern history.

Haiti's children: a year after the quake

It is almost a year to the day since a catastrophic earthquake measuring 7.0 on the Richter scale jolted Haiti’s capital Port-au-Prince, killing 230,000 people and wrecking over 330,000 homes.

Haiti: One year on from quake

As around a million and a half people camp out in squalor, rape is a daily occurrence, food is stolen, and most of the rubble from 330,000 wrecked homes is still piled high

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Joan Smith: We should button up and press on

What happened to Haiti is a catastrophe: delay to trains and planes isn't. Whatever happened to British fortitude?
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