Haiti hip-hop star Wyclef Jean turns presidential contender

Haitian hip-hop star Wyclef Jean registered as a presidential contender yesterday, in a move into politics that generated an outburst of popular enthusiasm in his poor, earthquake-ravaged homeland.

Wyclef Jean set to confirm run for Haitian presidency

He may be Haiti's best-known celebrity, but is he ready to be its head of state? That's the question Wyclef Jean must answer tonight, when he's expected to throw his back-to-front baseball cap into the ring by formally announcing his intention to stand in the country's forthcoming presidential elections.

Wyclef Jean 'will run for presidency'

The former head of Haiti's Chamber of Deputies says the singer Wyclef Jean is about to announce his candidacy for president of a nation struggling to recover from the 12 January earthquake. Pierre Eric Jean-Jacques told the Associated Press that the hip-hop artist will run as part of his coalition in the November election. Cindy Tanenbaum, spokeswoman for Jean, declined to confirm the report. She said the singer would make an announcement tomorrow night but declined to say what it would be. Rumours have swirled for months that Jean would run. The singer has always been careful not to rule out a run for the president and recorded a song "If I was President".

Marc Louis Bazin: Former Haitian Prime Minister and World Bank economist

Even within the constant shapeshifting of Haitian politics, Marc Louis Bazin's curriculum vitae was quite unique. He was a World Bank development economist when he was named minister for economy and finance in Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier's brutal and corrupt dictatorship in 1982. He was sacked and exiled after he criticised Duvalier's corruption and won the public nickname "Mr Clean" – a distinctly negative term in the young dictator Duvalier's limited vocabulary.

Joy for mother and baby 'lost' in Haiti quake

Clutching her baby for the first time since the Haiti earthquake, Marie Miracle Seignon's smile and middle name say it all.

Wyclef Jean mulling a run for Haiti presidency

Singer Wyclef Jean is considering running for president of Haiti but has not decided whether to seek a five-year term as leader of the earthquake-ravaged nation.

Leading article: Ready or not?

The news that the singer and philanthropist, Wyclef Jean, is contemplating a run for the Haitian presidency prompts thoughts about those from the world of entertainment who attempt to cross over into the realm of politics. The record is a mixed one. Ronald Reagan did well. And Arnold Schwarzenegger made it to the governor's mansion in California. Clint Eastwood had a brief spell as a Californian town mayor in the 1980s, but soon (thankfully) returned to films. Jerry Springer went the other way, becoming a talk show host after being a politician in Cincinnati. Here in Britain, we have Glenda Jackson in the House of Commons. The former AC Milan striker and world footballer of the year, George Weah, has been active in Liberian politics, but missed out in the 2005 presidential elections.

Hope in the soap that has Haitians glued to the TV

Under the Sky has all the drama of EastEnders, and explains how to keep the rats at bay. Guy Adams reports from Port-au-Prince

Spontaneous combustion: The return of Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire's first album catapulted the unconventional Canadian outfit into the rock stratosphere, drawing eulogies from Springsteen, Bowie, Byrne and more. Six years later, their third album is awaited with bated breath. Andy Gill sets the scene for the release of the year

Ashdown appointed 'disaster tsar'

Lord Ashdown has been made the Government's "disaster tsar", with the task of improving Britain's response to humanitarian emergencies such as the Haiti earthquake.

Wyclef Jean: 'Minus the smell, nothing has changed in six months'

Haiti's biggest star talks to Guy Adams about his frustrations at the pace of efforts to rebuild his shattered homeland

The Haiti earthquake six months on

Six months after enduring one of the deadliest natural disasters of the past century, the small republic of Haiti is finally showing signs of recovery.

Incredible tale of one mother and daughter who never gave up

The last time Ibola Samedi had hugged her 12-year-old daughter Lovely was after school on Tuesday, 12 January. A few minutes later, the earth began to shake. In seconds, Ms Samedi saw her house, in the Delmas district of Port-au-Prince, collapse.

Found: the nine-year-old orphan who became the symbol of Haiti's tragedy

In January, Wideline's only possession was a tartan dress. Now she has a school uniform - and hope for the future

Hollywood star shows how aid can help Haiti

Sean Penn's tent city for victims of January's quake is no publicity stunt. As Guy Adams reports from Port-au-Prince, it's the best relief operation in town
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